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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,

I'm looking for some sea kayak fishing advice. Here's some of the planned uses.

1) Being able to kayak around Elliot Bay and jig for ling cod
2) General mooching for salmon and fly fishing for SRC's
2) Being able to use the Kayak for non fishing purposes like longer trips to Blake island
3) I'm a big dude - 220- 6'4

I just started looking - so I know I'll need a little help to point in the right direction. I took a look at the Tarpon 160, but the open top design kind of freaks me out for use in the sound. Any thoughts on open vs. closed?

If i've left out any qualifying information, just let me know and I'll answer in the thread.
 

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I would check out Seaward kayaks. I own two: Passat G3 and Chinook. I prefer a closed deck for safety and sea keeping. Seawards have great resale value. Most sea kayaking guides use them for a good reason. They are fitted out very nicely and have great glass work. I prefer glass over thermoformed.

Last year I spent two weeks in my G3 in Desolation Sound, caught sevral nice Springs with no problem.

Good luck! Glenn
 

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I have owned both sit inside and sit on top kayaks. Of the two Ii prefer the sit on top. I did own the Tarpon 160 and that is a pretty fine kayak. I used mine on the Texas coast when I lived down there and did several multi-day fishing expedeitions with it. I prefer the safety of a sit on top for open water as you just flip it over and climb back aboard. No bailing, no learning to eskimo roll. While shorts and a nylon fishing shirt was the default kayaking attire in Texas during June, I don't think it will cut the mustard here in the Pacific Northwest. A dry or wet suit would be way more appropriate. While fishing from a kayak can be fun, especially when battling large fish, I have found that handling a paddle and rod and line at the same time to be more frustration than it's worth. My .02 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Guys - Thanks for the advice.

Glenn - I'll check out the Seaward kayaks. Good to know that a lot of the guides are using them. They usually put their gear through about 10 times the use I would. Question, why do you prefer glass?

Graham, thanks for the link - i'm on it now!
 

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Jesse,

I have owned both glass and thermoform. Each has it's advanatges:

Thermoform:
Pro: Lighter and less expensive
Con: Not as tough, not the best when on the roof racks in hot and sunny weather
I have owned a tandem thermoform and sold it after one season

Glass:
Pro: Tougher, Look better, more rigid
Cons: Slightly more $, slightly heavier

My Seaward G3 Tandem is glass, is an amazing kayak, very fast, stable, rock sollid.
My Seaward Chinook single is thermoform, very light, very stable, excellent for fishing in Puget Sound

I would not buy a tandem thermoform too much flex for a 22' sea kayak.
I also suggest buying high quality paddles, Werners are great!

I picked up both of my Seaward from their factory on Vancouver Island. If you do buy one PM me.

Cheers! Glenn
 

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Werners are really nice paddles, especially the Camano paddles. We both have Current Designs Solstice boats, but ours are expedition craft designed for week-long, unsupported trips. These are our second boats, first ones being rotomolded. I found the glass to be MUCH more responsive, lighter, faster, and more stable. I'm 6-2, and have no trouble handling the 17 foot length.
 

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Jesse, Take your time and do your research. I would check out the NWKA site for some ideas. I have gotten into fishing from an SOT kayak in the salt, and I wear one of two wetsuits I have. I would like to get a drysuit, but the one I like retails for $850. The new drysuits are very comfortable, but spendy. You can get a good wetsuit for much less.
Here the water is cold most of the time, and you must dress for the water. Right now the surface temp in the ocean here is around 50 F. I am wearing a 5mm (winter weight) O'Neil surfing wetsuit when i paddle here in the Harbor. I am probably going to get a farmer john wetsuit to wear with a "rash guard" and splash top (for better comfort when paddling, vs a full surfing wetsuit).

Both of my boats are roto-molded polyethylene, which is low maintenance and less expensive, but is heavy and has certain other drawbacks. They get soft in the sun/heat, and don't have the aesthetic quality of glass boats. However, you can kick 'em around more with less worry.
I have a Wilderness Systems Tarpon 140 and I like it. It is a solid, but heavy boat that paddles well, only 29" wide. Many SOT fishing yaks are wider for stability, but you lose paddling speed and efficiency in the tradeoff.
I would definitely check out the Hobie Mirage Drive SOT's, especially the 16' Adventure model, which is their largest, most seaworthy SOT. The Hobies are pedal driven, which leaves your hands free for trolling and casting. I am currently salivating over an "Adventure Island" model, which is the 16'er set up as a trimaran.
Generally, something around 13' or 14' is easier to maneuver and handle, both in the water and on the shore. The 16'ers are kind of beastly to handle roof-topping it, and have longer turning radii, but they come into their own when paddling any distance in bigger water and rougher conditions. My 14' Tarpon was a compromise between the maneuverability of a 12'er and the big water capability of a 16'er.

I agree with Alex about Werner paddles. They are among the best you can buy, and they're made right here in WA, in Sultan, I think. I also have a Werner Camano touring paddle, and I love it and don't regret paying the price at all. It has a carbon shaft and glass blade, and is really light, stiff, and tough. Lighter and stiffer is better.

I also have a Native watercraft Ultimate 12 hybrid canoe...which is a stable, low-profile canoe with a unique tunnel hull. I use this boat for the lakes, lower rivers, tidal creeks and protected backwaters. I can stand and cast in it, and it is highly maneuverable. I don't recommend it for deep, open water like the ocean, Strait, or any unprotected areas of the Salish Sea, but I feel OK taking into any coves or bays or inlets that are out of the wind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the generous response Jim. I'm adding you to my "friends" and will likely hit you up with a bunch of questions as I get closer to pulling the trigger.
 

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