Washington Fly Fishing Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance. 

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've decided to liquidate one of my gear rods to add another fly rod, as my 5wt looks lonely. After a fun summer of trout fishing and popper fishing for bass(especially this last week) I'm ready to take the next step and add an 8wt to my collection. I've got a line on a great deal on some redington gear and am torn between a single hander and a switch rod. I'll be using this mostly to chase silvers and steelies on the Nooksak and Skagit rivers. Please don't ask me how I'll be fishing(swingin,nymphing,ect) because I really dont know. I am self taught as all my buddies are die hard gear heads and refuse to pick up a fly rod. Everything I've learned about fly fishing has come from lurking around here:) I consider myself a quick learner and I think im pretty decent at casting a fly rod. At this point I'm kind of leaning toward the switch rod. Is this a bad idea or not, and why. What are the pro's and cons. Thanks in advance for your suggestions, Simon.
 

·
Long Lost Member
Joined
·
20,209 Posts
Simon, many will say that learning two handed casts on a switch rod will be tough and that two handed casting is best left for something in the 12'6" to 13'6" range. I have a few switch rods and truly enjoy them. If you think you will be single handing them all day, especially an 8wt, you'll be dog tired and shoulder sore by the end of your shortened day. If you commit to learning how to use it with two hands and you are a quick learner then by all means go for the switch rod. It will provide more options in tight quarters, a bit longer lever to pressure the fish and casting options that you won't get with a single hander. That said, having a good 8w single hander in the quiver just seems right, so I have one or two. I have not used my 8wt single hander in a while due to having the switch, except for some chum chasing last year. If you can go somewhere that has both an 8wt single properly lined and an 8wt switch properly lined take them for a test drive. You'll be happy and cover more fishing situations by adding either to stand alongside your 5wt. If you truly get bitten by the fly fishing bug you'll likely find them more company in time. If you go the two handed route, read this thread and go see Mike. It will be worth every minute of your time and you'll have the basic skills to cast a two handed rod in no time.
http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com...asting-clinics-up-North?highlight=Mike+Kinney
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,662 Posts
If you are a lurker then you have read many of the threads on this site. There are obvious uses for single handed and two handed rods. Switch rods were intended to breech the gap in certain situations. Two handed casting is enjoyable, less stress on your shoulders, elbows, and back, and a switch rod can take the place of a couple of different sizes/types of rods. The "quiver" Mumbles speaks of is the number of different sizes of rods a person owns or aspires to own. If you really look at fly rods, they are far smaller in diameter than gear rods, for the most part and every weight, brand, lenght and action casts differently and is used in varying situations. Most gear rods will cover a number of situatiuons and are, by nature, heavier than fly rods. No one fly rod will cover all situations and that's why it's necessary to more closely define the situations you will be in before true recommendations can be made.

Once you decide what you are going to chase then you can buiild your quiver but a single switch rod will not be sufficient for all situations. They work well, as suggested, in tight spots and they cast farther than single handed rods while overhead casting, given the skill level of the caster is consistent. Personally, I'm moving away from single hand rods because of the stress on my body but I will not be getting rid of all single handed rods because they have specific uses for types of fishing I like to do.

But... if you are river fishing for salmon/steelhead only and you have the ability to "pick up" the skill, then two handed will work well and a switch rod will work. I've been told it's easier to cast longer rods because of the leverage factor but I don't find that to be true, necessarily. I own two switch rods and four other two-handers in varying weights and lengths, each serving a specific purpose.

What's your budget? Temple Fork builds a nice switch in varying weights as do other companies. Then you have to think about a line to match up properly for your rod and type of fishing, and then a reel that will balance well with the rod and hold the line and backing that you choose. It's not that complicated but you do have to define what you want to do in order to not make costly mistakes. Make no mistake. Fly fishing can be a very expensive endeavor compared to other types of fishing.
 

·
Custom Title
Joined
·
12,145 Posts
Haven't tried a Spey, but love my 7/8 Beulah switch . . . picked-up the technique with little trouble & can still throw one-handed if the spirit so moves me.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top