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So I recently moved up to Seattle after spending the first 34 years of my life in AZ and i'm totally lost.

Down there we didn't have seasons, no "runs" of salmon to try and time, and lots of fishing that could be done without a boat.

Up here I'm seeing a lot of water without a much available shoreline and hearing locals in Seattle tell me "you really need a boat or a guide". Neither of which I can afford at the moment.

Any suggestions? I don't care what I catch really, or how big it is. I also love backpacking and fishing at the same time.

Thanks.
 

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Welcome Lasivian. PM sent. I'm not that knowledgable but I sent you a few things that might help you find fun to fish water.
 

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First, welcome! Way different fishing than AZ, as you now know . . .

But, who told you that you need a guide or boat, or that there isn't much access? If you're talking saltwater, there are many public beaches with great access. Heck, I live in north Seattle, and there is a public beach (Carkeek Park) less than a mile from my house! Do a search for searun cutts or resident coho, and there will be enough info to keep you busy for some time. Hit one of the fly shops, and they'll have info plus books that you can pick up that will give you a lot of good advice. For me, whenever I go somewhere new, I find fly shops are a treasure trove of information for where to go, when to go, what lines to use, what flies to use, what to expect, etc.
 

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Welcome to Seattle and fishing the streams, lakes and saltwater. There are lots of opportunities and access to public fishing as others have already indicated. Use the "search" function for the different species and you'll find a ton of information. I live two miles or so from Lincoln Park in West Seattle and that's where I started fishing the salt nine months ago. I've caught searun cutthroats and salmon there with joggers, walkers, etc. twenty feet behind me. It makes for fun challenges not hooking up on the backcast. If you see someone fishing, go up and chat with them. I haven' t run into anyone that wasn't really helpful in sharing their knowledge with me.
 

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I know your pain. I moved to WA in 97 from CO. Lived in AZ for 20, 8 in N. AZ. The toughest adjustment for me was the terrain and fish species. The resident trout populations are not the same in W WA. Also, the forest terrain is very different. I know the Rim region like the back of my hand. I could have a topo and figure out how to hike into rivers and lakes. Here, the forest is so dense, it takes significantly longer, not to mention the energy, to cut through the bush. Then, many W WA rivers do not have the resident trout pops that you find in the rivers and streams of AZ.

That said, W WA has great opportunities. Steelhead fishing is a blast. Now you do not need a guide but I would take a trip or two. Well worth the money and a great way to learn an area and how to attack the fish. There are some really good places to fish from shore for salmon. I lived in Bremerton for ten years and had way too many options! It did not hurt that my boss lived on Miami Beach and grew up in the area. He turned me onto all the places to crab, shrimp, fish in all of WA.
Use the search function and check out the info. Don’t be afraid to get out and explore. WA has great opportunities. Also, you need to go squid fishing! It is a blast.
 

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You don't need a boat, but you will need a float tube to fish the lakes this spring, summer and fall. Start saving now. It's a must have investment for trout fishing around here.
 

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DEFINITELY DO NOT NEED A BOAT...
Read everything you can by Les Johnson
Read everything u can by Bill Herzog
Listen to AM radio KJR 950 Saturday Mornings 6a-8a ( also podcasts) show is NORTHWEST WILD COUNTRY
All Seattle Area Fly Shops are really helpful
i think you will like it here...a very cool place... (except for dimbulbs who told u needed a sled)
 

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If you come to the Orvis store in Bellevue this Saturday at 1:00PM, you will hear Derek Young, an Endorsed Guide, present a free seminar on fishing the Yakima River as well as anybody else who wants to get up with the "open mike." There may also be some "open mike" seminars on the Columbia Basin Lakes (Lenore, Nunnally, Lenice, Merry, & Dry Falls. I guarantee you will have all the info you need.

Leland.
 

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The Washington Gazette book of maps is a good place to start.

Personal exploration yields some big rewards! There is a lot of water that gets very little presure but it takes effort to find it.

Another good source is the regualation pamphlet. It lists the lakes with public access. Some of these are fished heavily and others hardly at all. If you can tolerate the urban fishing exerience there are a lot of lakes all around Seattle like Pine, Beaver, Rattelsnake for example. Probably the most underfished lake in the area is Lake Washington. It has some really big fish and there are quite a few parks that a person can access. I have heard that there are some nice bass to be had around the Arboretum at the U of W. Green Lake in the middle of town has some respectable fishing. The spring and summer spandex hatch can be somewhat distracting!!

June many of the rivers open up. The Cedar river has some very quality trout and a lot of bank a person can get onto. True there are lots of areas a person can not get into on the rivers but then there are also lots of spots a prson can get into. It just takes looking around to find them and it really isn't all that difficult. Cruise the roads along the rivers and you will find a lot of areas. The Cascade mountain range from BC to Oregon lies in National Forest lands. All of that is available and there are plenty of roads along rivers to explore. Some you may have to walk and others you can drive. There are many developed trails into the high country that go into the Alpine Lakes. If that is your thing then maybe you want to consider joining the High Lakers.

I hope some of this is helpful.

Dave
 

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When my son got done at Central WA U he moved to Phoenix and has been there for 8 years now. Like you in reverse he was lost when it came to fishing in the Phoenix area, having been used to fishing the Yakima right at his doorstep. I sent him a subscription to Southwest Fly Fisher, but he is reluctant to drive as far as northern AZ for fishing and said the Salt River and Lake Pleasant just don't cut it for him. You have lots of good advice here. If you like to hike and fish, apply for a permit to the Enchantments near Leavenworth. The best mountain scenery you will ever see and lots of pan-sized cutthroats in the lakes that need to be kept as all the lakes are overpopulated. I especially like Shield Lake for its isolation and abundant trout! Another idea is get a guided trip from Dave McCoy from Emerald Waters Anglers for some small stream fishing in Western WA-with a 2 wt rod you will have a blast. You will really get to like the fishing opportunities here as you get to know the place! Rick
 

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well, the obv ones are....

beaches for cuttrhoat that are in the ocean (SRC). use a floating line and a 5/6 and fishing during big tidal flucation. Look for fishi holding structure and fish the sound like it was a big river. Fish will be close to shore often in less then 1-5 ft of water.

Yakima river, wade or drift fish for trout.

Olmpic Penn rivers for steelhead and salmon (7/8 wts) swinging flies or nymphing. (not ur best option to be honest)

Rocky Ford Creek for large rainbows (wading only, but feet cant go in the creek). (5/6 scuds, leeches,)

That gives you a few options within 2~ hours of seattle and i didnt even give away any secerts!
 

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If you love backpacking and fishing you'll be having a great time once the high lakes melt out. You can start exploring lakes on the fringes of the mountains right now. As spring advances and snow levels start to rise you can get into the mountains proper. Backpacking options will really start to open up in June, and by mid-July most high lakes will be ice-free. Trout Fishing in Washington's High Lakes on WDFW's website is a good introduction. Also check out the Hi-Lakers' and Trail Blazers' websites.
 

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Lasivian & Native Spawner,
Where in Az were you?
I spent many years out of Payson and also knew the Rim Country quite well. Chevelon Canyon was my go to place at that time. Every day was a good day. My favorite was to hike down Telephone Canyon and spend a few days. Incredible fishing then. I left in 87 and haven't been back since. I've wondered what it is like now.
Any information about that?
Thanks,
Lasivian, as stated by others, there is fishing here. If you want backpacking and fishing there's tons available. I you travel to the dark side and go for steelhead and the anadromous stuff you may find yourself having an experience that becomes a habit that you may curse at times! :eek:
Dan
 
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