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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

Curious as to recommendations for a vise that will be capable of tying SRC flies all the way up to flies for steelhead? Is there such a vise? Trying to gain knowledge and make a purchase soon. Price cap at about $350.

Thank you for the help!
 

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At that price cap, you'll have many vise brands and styles to choose from.

HMH... ;)

PS...do a search on vises...there have been many discussions on the pros and cons of vise selections recently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for all the great reccomendations everyone! The Renzetti Traveler looks like it would work great for me. So many different options out there I could go crazy :eek:
 

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Spend half that on the vise then the rest in hooks and materials.
THIS! Spend $100 on a Danvise, buy more hooks/tools/adhesives/materials and go to town. A Dan was my first rotary vise, I used it for many years, gave it to a Montana Nephew and he's still churning out flies 3 years later (I had purchased a J-Vise for myself as a retirement present.).
 

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While I won't necessarily disagree with the "spend $175 on the vise and put the rest into mats" philosophy...I also would stop short of unequivocally saying to do it that way.

More accurately, I'd ask you how confident you are that tying will be a lifelong hobby/pursuit/passion? And how seriously you expect to get into it.

I ask because while that $175 price point will absolutely get you well beyond the "entry level", and into vises that will serve you well your entire life...if you can budget $350 for a vise, you're likely going to be able to pick up materials as you see fit without much in the way of financial hand-wringing, and mats are the kind of thing that if you only want to spend $10-20 at a clip, you can do it. You can't exactly buy vise like that.

Further, while $175 will get you a LOT of vise, and you wouldn't need to ever upgrade, at that price point, the time may come where you'd like to upgrade. For me, in that $250-375 range is where vises seem to go from "top of the line functionally" into "extravagance" (that's just me personally, though...some guys may consider things a functional upgrade that I'd consider "flair", while others may look at things I consider functional as frivolous).

Obviously, it's up to you, but the way I tend to look at things, if I were in your shoes, I'd probably be looking at $250-350 vises...that gets you into things like the Dyna-King Trekker, the Renzetti Presentation 2000 series, and just about any Regal short of the Revolution (and even there you could swing the clamp model). Though with that said, it's also true that this is with hindsight, knowing how much I like to tie. If you're not sure, or you only plan to strictly tie the bare minimum to put workhorse patterns in a box, then I couldn't justify the extra spending.

Just something else to think about!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
While I won't necessarily disagree with the "spend $175 on the vise and put the rest into mats" philosophy...I also would stop short of unequivocally saying to do it that way.

More accurately, I'd ask you how confident you are that tying will be a lifelong hobby/pursuit/passion? And how seriously you expect to get into it.

I ask because while that $175 price point will absolutely get you well beyond the "entry level", and into vises that will serve you well your entire life...if you can budget $350 for a vise, you're likely going to be able to pick up materials as you see fit without much in the way of financial hand-wringing, and mats are the kind of thing that if you only want to spend $10-20 at a clip, you can do it. You can't exactly buy vise like that.

Further, while $175 will get you a LOT of vise, and you wouldn't need to ever upgrade, at that price point, the time may come where you'd like to upgrade. For me, in that $250-375 range is where vises seem to go from "top of the line functionally" into "extravagance" (that's just me personally, though...some guys may consider things a functional upgrade that I'd consider "flair", while others may look at things I consider functional as frivolous).

Obviously, it's up to you, but the way I tend to look at things, if I were in your shoes, I'd probably be looking at $250-350 vises...that gets you into things like the Dyna-King Trekker, the Renzetti Presentation 2000 series, and just about any Regal short of the Revolution (and even there you could swing the clamp model). Though with that said, it's also true that this is with hindsight, knowing how much I like to tie. If you're not sure, or you only plan to strictly tie the bare minimum to put workhorse patterns in a box, then I couldn't justify the extra spending.

Just something else to think about!
This is something I've been thinking about as well. I know I said I'd like to purchase soon but I am in no rush so this is an option. Fly fishing is a passion for me so fly tying can only become a second passion. And I'm not one to give up, the challenge will be rewarding. A local fly shop I stopped in sells Regal and I did take a liking to them. I'm always in favor of supporting local!
 

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On the other hand, I tied for the last 3-4 year’s on a Thompson knockoff I got at an estate sale for ten bucks. Must have tied hundreds of flies on it before I picked up a traveler this fall. There are good nonrotary vises for less than a hundred that you can use to learn and test the waters. My personal bias: 350 is a lot for a vise, but I’m cheap.


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Spend half that on the vise then the rest in hooks and materials.
Agree here and then some! Go to your local shop with a couple of hooks and ask to see how the vises they carry actually hold the hook and then buy the cheapest one that you find capable of doing that and spend the rest on hooks and enough materials to tie the flies that you like to fish. I've tied for 48 years and the most I've spent on a vise is $50 for a used Griffin Superior 3ARP. It's not the dough you blow but what comes from it and the vise is really not that important. I would rate the most important tying tool that I have as my scissors. I can tie without a vise, without hackle pliers, without a bobbin and without a whip finish tool but I need scissors to help me select, prepare and trim as needed what I tie.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Agree here and then some! Go to your local shop with a couple of hooks and ask to see how the vises they carry actually hold the hook and then buy the cheapest one that you find capable of doing that and spend the rest on hooks and enough materials to tie the flies that you like to fish. I've tied for 48 years and the most I've spent on a vise is $50 for a used Griffin Superior 3ARP. It's not the dough you blow but what comes from it and the vise is really not that important. I would rate the most important tying tool that I have as my scissors. I can tie without a vise, without hackle pliers, without a bobbin and without a whip finish tool but I need scissors to help me select, prepare and trim as needed what I tie.
Great advice, thank you!
 

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One thing you might do to see what sort of approach you may want to use is to look at your purchase decisions in other areas of your life.

I'm convinced that buyer philosophy is almost as important as the technical details of whatever it is that's being bought.

What I mean is take a look at your fly rods and reels. Do you tend to be a "This $50 Wal-mart rod gets me on the water and doesn't break...that means it does everything I need, so spending anything over $50 on a fly rod is stupid"...or on the other end you might be a..."Yeah, I know this rod cost me $1,200. But it's got feel, and soul...and there's a joy to holding it and using it that you just can't get with a lesser rod."

Most people will fall somewhere between these two extremes, but most fall into one of two camps: "This product, at the end of the day, does what it must in order for me to get it done. Therefore I see no reason to upgrade." or "Would stepping up add to my quality of life while using this item? If so, can I justify the extra cost it'd present?"

If you fall into the first group, then you want to go even cheaper than $175. You can get a vise that will hold a hook decently for $50-75. It ain't gonna do much of anything else, it might have fussy adjustments, rough fit & finish, not stay set where you put it, wear out over time, or any number of other quirks...but if you're only look for "holds a hook", that's your buy.

If you're in the second...the question is a bit different, and it's hard to say with 100% accuracy what features matter to you when you don't have the tying experience with that feature. That last part is important when you're getting advice too...as I see lots of guys saying both "I've tied for fifty years with a non-rotary vise and it's never prevented me from tying a fly! You don't need that." and "I started tying with a rotary vise and I use it all the time...can't imagine tying without it."...and imho, they're both equally misleading.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
One thing you might do to see what sort of approach you may want to use is to look at your purchase decisions in other areas of your life.

I'm convinced that buyer philosophy is almost as important as the technical details of whatever it is that's being bought.

What I mean is take a look at your fly rods and reels. Do you tend to be a "This $50 Wal-mart rod gets me on the water and doesn't break...that means it does everything I need, so spending anything over $50 on a fly rod is stupid"...or on the other end you might be a..."Yeah, I know this rod cost me $1,200. But it's got feel, and soul...and there's a joy to holding it and using it that you just can't get with a lesser rod."

Most people will fall somewhere between these two extremes, but most fall into one of two camps: "This product, at the end of the day, does what it must in order for me to get it done. Therefore I see no reason to upgrade." or "Would stepping up add to my quality of life while using this item? If so, can I justify the extra cost it'd present?"

If you fall into the first group, then you want to go even cheaper than $175. You can get a vise that will hold a hook decently for $50-75. It ain't gonna do much of anything else, it might have fussy adjustments, rough fit & finish, not stay set where you put it, wear out over time, or any number of other quirks...but if you're only look for "holds a hook", that's your buy.

If you're in the second...the question is a bit different, and it's hard to say with 100% accuracy what features matter to you when you don't have the tying experience with that feature. That last part is important when you're getting advice too...as I see lots of guys saying both "I've tied for fifty years with a non-rotary vise and it's never prevented me from tying a fly! You don't need that." and "I started tying with a rotary vise and I use it all the time...can't imagine tying without it."...and imho, they're both equally misleading.
This is great. I must say I do love a little feel and a little soul :D all great points though. I guess I really just need to go for what I know will work without blowing the bank nor being a money miser. There seems to be many middle of the road options that could be great for me!
 

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I currently own a regal, two dynakings, an atlas and a norvice. If you are in the Spokane area just pm me you are welcome to take any of them home and try them for a month ( except my fancy dyna king, wedding gift from my wife 22 years ago) you can try it out at my place though. I personally believe you need to tie on a vice for a while before you make a big purchase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I currently own a regal, two dynakings, an atlas and a norvice. If you are in the Spokane area just pm me you are welcome to take any of them home and try them for a month ( except my fancy dyna king, wedding gift from my wife 22 years ago) you can try it out at my place though. I personally believe you need to tie on a vice for a while before you make a big purchase.
Ahhh unfortunately on the west side. Thank you for this offer though, I very much appreciate it! Advice taken I am planning to tie on a few different vises before a purchase.
 
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