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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a very basic question for fly fishing on lakes. What is the best overall line type to fish with a streamer or wolley bugger? Sinking? Sinking tip?

I heard about a line with interchangeable sinking tips? Are those any good

thanks
 

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I seldom use a full sinking line when fishing lakes, I prefer a fast sinking sink tip. Though I carry spools with floating, sink tip, intermediate sink, and fast sinking lines. But I always seem to fish the sink tip the most. You can fish streamers and Wooley Buggers on a floating line also, especially in the evening during the evening hatch time. The type of line used must relate to the depth of the lake , the time of year, and time of the day.

Keith
 

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Just an Old Man
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Talking about fly lines. I didn't know that there was so many lines out there for all the different types of fly fishing. Lines for nymphing, lines for floating flies, sinking lines for sinking flies, lines for lines. I was happy when there were only a few different lines out there. A DT or a WF, sinking or floating. I was happy then, now I ain't.
 

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Just an Old Man
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I use a WF floating line now. I use it for everything. I nymph with it and dry fly fish with it. The rivers I fish are not very big so one line will do it for me. And I'm happy.
 

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I have a very basic question for fly fishing on lakes. What is the best overall line type to fish with a streamer or wolley bugger? Sinking? Sinking tip?

I heard about a line with interchangeable sinking tips? Are those any good

thanks
Intermediate when fishing around structure (submerged crap that fish like to hide around which also likes to snag your fly) and in the shallows. A line that sinks any faster will only get snagged by the time you regain control of your line after a cast. The slow sink rate will give you more control. If you need to go deeper, then count down longer while you wait. This is part of the control factor. Snaggy places, like around the edges of Rattlesnake Lake (submerged stumps), Pass Lake, and Martha Lake (WB), all call for an Intermediate line. In these places, you're generally going to be casting and retrieving or trolling the deeper water very, very slowly.

If you're fishing some place like Dry Falls or the middle of Rattlesnake Lake, then a fast(er) sinking line will serve you well while you troll. Faster sinking the line, deeper the water you will be able to work.

I also think Keith Hixon is onto something when he brought up the sink-tip line. These can be fairly quick to take a fly to depth, but, since it's only the tip that's sinking, I would think the buoyant running section would cause the tip section and the fly to draw upward with every strip retrieve of the line. In the big picture, you're probably looking at some kind of sine wave motion at a given depth. This is good for leech patterns. A full sinking line that's also density compensated will swim a streamer in a flat manner--unless the fly has a bead-head. This might prove best for "wounded minnow" patterns, crayfish patterns, and other surging swimmer type things. These surge forward and then lamely sink.

In the end, as Keith pointed out, it's about marrying your fly and line to the situation ("...the depth of the lake, the time of year, and time of the day...") you're plan on fishing. I also try to keep in mind food the fish might have available at the moment. From there, I choose the fly and the line.

Tight Lines!
--Dave E.
 

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This thread should be an article for anyone new. Great information here.
 

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It would be tough to limit myself to just one line for fishing stillwaters, but if I had to it would be the intermediate line with a 1.5-2 in/sec sink rate. Strip it fast to keep it up in the column, patience and it will eventually reach the bottom. It limits your retrieves ect, but still.

Again, I wouldn't be caught dead with just one line on a lake, but put a gun to me and this is the one I am using 75% of the time. I like Rio's aqualux.

Jarron
 

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Formerly FlyCatcherman, formerly Don_The_Fly
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The answers are right. Water depth and where the fish are holding is everything to the line you use. If I had to only have two lines it would be a floating and a intermediate sinking for all around use.
 

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If you are new and setting up for stillwater, I'd start with a floater, then an intermediate, then a sinker. Do yourself a favor and make all of the reels and spools compatible.
 

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One more thing everybody forgot to mention. Match a short leader with your sinking lines. 5 feet or less is what you should be using. It might be Rio who makes these 5 foot and clear Intermediate sink leaders. Don't worry about spooking fish, as submerged lines don't spook trout. Moreover, the short leader will facilitate casting weighted flies and larger streamers.

--Dave E.
 

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I didn't care for the multiple tip line I had. It did not cast as well as I am accustomed to and the connections were lumpy and didn't feed through the eyes well. Not for me. Just thought I'd add that data point.

Go get em'!
 
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