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I'm new to your forum and fishing in Washington being a Vancouver Islander, although not new to fishing forums in general. I recently hooked up with a good woman who has rv property at Black Mountain Ranch near Deming, bless her soul, which is a stone's throw to the Nooksack. So...... just looking for some general info on the area and fishing the Nooksack which I understand has just re-opened. Some info on public access points to wade, special regs I should be aware of, would be greatly appreciated. I'm C&R only so don't fear some damn canadian eating your fish :) Thanks in advance and hey, if you're ever heading to the island, shoot me a message, I might be able to help.
 

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Welcome to the board.:thumb:
What's her name and number?:rofl:
Lucky Canucky!
 

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Welcome! No trout here. I would head back over the line and then maybe in September think about the Nooksack for salmon. Coho on the S. Fork and maybe just maybe if any fish poke through chum and then later a slim possibility of hatchery steelhead. All the best. While a beautiful river, it is in the process of recovery like many of our Western rivers.
 

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Switch Rod Samurai
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There ARE trout in the Nooky... you need to hit the upper reaches of the north fork, but below the falls. Don't expect to catch much :p The bull trout will all be in the salt water for the most part, but there may be some in there willing to chase a purple or black wooly bugger with a bead head. Good luck, fish it again in February when the big winter steelhead are in... thee may not be many, but some are absolute MONSTERS
 

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The overall picture of the Nooksack River and its forks is that it's a once-great and pristine, once robust and productive mountain river that has been so ravaged by ham-handed human resource exploitation, combined with its naturally thin and unstable soils, that it's now mostly a thinly populated, usually muddy sluiceway from the glaciers to Puget Sound. Picture an old, sick bear snoring in a zoo cage. It has significant numbers of anadromous fish, at times, in some places.
 

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Switch Rod Samurai
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I will have to agree with a lot of that...but the big wide gravel bars are so beautiful, and it can be really clear water in the winter at times. I've had some excellent days on the ol' sak....but not many
 
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