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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks!

I'm sort of new to the flyfishing forum...so if I break any golden rules, please put me in check!

I'm heading up to Pass lake in a few days and am wondering if anyone could post a little insight on how to nail a few tight lines while there.

What's the best way to fish'em? We'll be using a canoe and working all the water possible...

Any word on the so called fresh spring feeding the lake? Best time of day? Fly patterns?

Thanks in advance for your feedback.
 

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Rich Layendecker
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I was at Pass Lake on Saturday. So where 20+ others. Anyway, some folks were consistently catching nice fish (14 - 19") on chronomids, most managed to hook up with 1 or 2 fish during the day. Generally people seemed to be fishing small chronomids on long leaders with strike indicators. This is a technique I cannot get the hang of. Maybe someone who knows it better can give you (and me) better instructions on how to fish chronomids.
 

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Here's a few tips on chironomid fishing

While I am by no means an expert here, I have caught a ton of fish doing the following:
1. Start with a size 18 and work bigger. Stop at size 8.
2. Use as long a leader as you can manage. The Kamloops boys(some the world's finest fishermen) can turn over 25ft. Practise this.
3. Remember that the fish are very spooky. At Chopaka, I could get one hit after another on 7X but I thought I couldn't bring them to net quick enough for a decent release. So I switched to 5X. The bite really slowed down. But even with this heavier tippet, I could not really pressure the big ones to hand. 3X stopped the bite all together. Take your choice here, but be responsible.
4. Use two anchors to hold the boat perfectly still. You must not drag the nymph.
5. Be sure you are as close to the bottom as you can get. Measure the bottom carefully.
6. If there is nothing on the bottom (rare), then move up through the water, including very close to the surface.
7. Cast as far as you can. The fish must not see the boat.
8. Put a tiny, black swivel(Cabela's) about 18" up from the chron. This will help sink the bug so it is straight up and down from the indicator. It must be so aligned.
9. Don't worry about a quick strike. They will pull the indicator off in one direction or another and basically hook themselves. If you doze off, be sure your rod is secure.
10. If you don't get much, say in a half hour or so, move. What you are trying to do is to locate a nice school and pick them off like ripe berries from an unspoiled patch. Look for weeds, then move out to about 9ft. deep and then move out to about 16-18 ft. I never fish deeper than that with chironomids.
Try black first, then brown, then red. Green is good as well. I carry everything which includes somewhere near a thousand flies, including over one hundred chironomids in one box. Many times, though, I just don't seem to have the right one.
Print this, fold it up and stick it in your vest, When fishing chirons, look it over. :thumb
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here's a few tips on chironomid fishing

Boblawless,

Even if we don't catch anything, you're a gentleman and a scholar for taking the time to educate a couple of young fishermen on the ins/outs of fishing chironomids at Pass! :professor

I'll be sure to come back and post to let you know how we do. Thank you again for your time and information...information that one would expect to get while out with dad or G'pa, but not a fellow forum member. Here's to you! :beer2
 
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