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Friendly
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2,004 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)

The river and run he talks about in this video is no more than 5 minutes from my house. It was in 2008 I started to Spey for steelhead. One of the sadest parts of the crash is that so many people in our area have no idea it ocured. For the past 8 years I have been waiting for the fish to return to the Puyallup. Not so that I could fish for them. But just to see and know they could make a comeback. It is such a great body of water once you get pass the levies.
 

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Buenos Hatches Ese
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1,585 Posts
I grew up down there too, and his description is spot on. I remember as a kid in the 90's, when there were fish in the river the number of people stacked top to bottom on those runs was a pretty pathetic sight to see. Anywhere there was access between Fife and Orting would get choked full of dudes. Add the nets and those fish never had a chance... I'm glad that my dad did not partake in that and we would go toss flies at trout instead. I swear the Puyallup River valley is the mouth-breathing capital of the northwest....
 

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Registered
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695 Posts
Good video, but they seem to imply the runs crashed due to overfishing. While that likely contributed, the root cause(s) are much more complex.

The first and last WA steelhead I caught were both within walking distance of the house I grew up in. It's now been over 10 years since my steelhead flies have seen the light of day.

There are encouraging signs though. Spawning numbers have increased in some watersheds despite continued population growth in the Puget Sound region. There's still hope.
 

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The Dude Abides
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2,467 Posts
Good video, but they seem to imply the runs crashed due to overfishing. While that likely contributed, the root cause(s) are much more complex.

The first and last WA steelhead I caught were both within walking distance of the house I grew up in. It's now been over 10 years since my steelhead flies have seen the light of day.

There are encouraging signs though. Spawning numbers have increased in some watersheds despite continued population growth in the Puget Sound region. There's still hope.
The other 5 videos in the upcoming series will address the other issues
 
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