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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I'm wondering if any of you who have their legs dangling in the water at this time of year use these things.

I normally use a pair of the disposable foot warmers. They work fine when I'm walking & wading but when I'm just lazily kicking around my feet end up being blocks of ice. Plus at 2 or 3 bucks a pair, it doesn't take long to equal a set of powered socks.

So, if anyone has used them, what are the pro's & con's you've experienced?
 

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I'm no use regarding the socks but have yet to hear anything great about the options either. Agreed on the foot and toe warmers, that's been my experience too. FWIW best I've found is leave enough room around your feet and, in cold water conditions (sub 45 for me), get out and walk 5-10 min when your feet start to hurt. About every 2 hrs in my case. Idea is not to warm up too fast or too much...when your calves start to itch you're done. Surprising how much that'll restore.

Sorry I know that doesn't answer your question but...
 

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What you want is the electric socks made by Gerbings Heated Clothing.

I run my socks off a deep cycle battery. I usually have to unplug the socks every twenty minutes or so because my feet start to sweat (in 38 degree water!!!).
 

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Lue Taylor/dbfly
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Tim and MD try their waterproof Seal skinz socks works well for me, Never had anything good out of toe warmers. The other thing you can do is not constrict the blood flow in your foot by have too many thing on making sure your boot are big enough to put extra socks on I normally wear a size 10 wading boot but for the last 5 yrs been using a size 12 so i can put extra clothes on. i also wear an moisture wicking sock under my Seal Skinz
 

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What you want is the electric socks made by Gerbings Heated Clothing.

I run my socks off a deep cycle battery. I usually have to unplug the socks every twenty minutes or so because my feet start to sweat (in 38 degree water!!!).
I have had that same pair...from the same store for 3 years now. I use a 22 AH SLA battery, I've gotten 3 days consecutive use out of it with just the socks. Big difference is with toasty feet, I use less & lighter layers of thermal and fleece.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Holy cow, I was figuring a couple 9 volts or some AA's. I hadn't even considered there were socks out there that ran on motorcycle or wheelchair batteries. Now I might have to find a way to bring along the TV/DVD combo that I keep in my little travel trailer. ;) Just kidding.

Thanks for sharing. It's given me lots to consider.

Mike d
 

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CCA, Hatchery Wild Coexist
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i agree with the socks + room + get out and walk it off. my problem is carrying too much stuff around in cold weather. takes more time to un-layer than it does to put tube/rods/fins in the truck.
 

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never used electrics and wont ever. that said, my mehthod works good for me.

step one, get some old big boots.

step 2, start with a knee high compression sock (thin ski style sock).

over that goes a thin wool hiking sock

and on top of that I wear a high density heavy wool sock

and the wader boot.


my goal is to create some dead air space between the foot and the neoprene, while still wicking away any moisture fromt he skin. I think most of the warm is coming from the middle layer. the outer layers (boot and neoprene and heavy wool) are the barrier to the cold, the middle sock is the insulation layer, and the compression sock wicks and keeps me comfy and still lets me tighten my flippers nice withough compressing all the insulation or cutting off blood flow.


its a pain in the ass but it allows me to fish all day. at ice off, i still get outt and do some jogging whe i have to piss. Ill usually take a quick lap up any nearby hills.
 

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Holy cow, I was figuring a couple 9 volts or some AA's. I hadn't even considered there were socks out there that ran on motorcycle or wheelchair batteries. Now I might have to find a way to bring along the TV/DVD combo that I keep in my little travel trailer. ;) Just kidding.

Thanks for sharing. It's given me lots to consider.

Mike d
Gerbings sells heated everything for motorcycles. They do sell a pair of socks with 7.2 vdc rechargeable batteries, but they were twice the cost. The ones with D cells or 9 volt batteries are close to worthless, imho.
 

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I use the foot warmers. The trick for me is to open the packet about 20-30 minutes before I put my waders on. That activates them and they get warm. If I open the packet and put them in my waders, I don't think they get enough air to activate and they don't get warm enough.
 

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Justified
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Hi All,

I'm wondering if any of you who have their legs dangling in the water at this time of year use these things.

I normally use a pair of the disposable foot warmers. They work fine when I'm walking & wading but when I'm just lazily kicking around my feet end up being blocks of ice. Plus at 2 or 3 bucks a pair, it doesn't take long to equal a set of powered socks.

So, if anyone has used them, what are the pro's & con's you've experienced?
They make some "high tech" stuff these days. Several styles/brands that make foot warmers, that are cushy soles inserts, with cell phone size batteries that fit inside the sole insert itself.

I have the same issue as you. I have found (as others have suggested - just "confirming") that thick socks, with boots lossened a bit - allowing for some space, disposable hand warmers on top of toes, works best.

One other thing. I actually took an additional set of hand warmers, and put them under my thigh/behind knee (that space right about your knee on the back of your leg) and wow! That alone about does it. Problem is, getting it to stay there while kicking around. Double sided tape does "okay", but still had to adjust it time to time. Still worth the extra "work" though.
 
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never used electrics and wont ever. that said, my mehthod works good for me.

step one, get some old big boots.

step 2, start with a knee high compression sock (thin ski style sock).

over that goes a thin wool hiking sock

and on top of that I wear a high density heavy wool sock

and the wader boot.

my goal is to create some dead air space between the foot and the neoprene, while still wicking away any moisture fromt he skin. I think most of the warm is coming from the middle layer. the outer layers (boot and neoprene and heavy wool) are the barrier to the cold, the middle sock is the insulation layer, and the compression sock wicks and keeps me comfy and still lets me tighten my flippers nice withough compressing all the insulation or cutting off blood flow.

its a pain in the ass but it allows me to fish all day. at ice off, i still get outt and do some jogging whe i have to piss. Ill usually take a quick lap up any nearby hills.
@Dustin Bise , you and @Tim Lockhart have a similar strategy for making a float tube work in winter conditions. The last couple years I've switched to fishing out of pram, which largely eliminates the issue. But last week I was out in my Watermaster wearing waders with my feet in the lake. For the first time ever, I took a break from fishing and got out to take a little walk to warm up. My feet came back to life, I felt better overall, and I kept fishing for a total of 9 hours with water temps in the low 40's. This was so much better than toughing it out and ending up painfully cold (and likely hypothermic) at the end of the day . . . .which used to be pretty common for me.
 
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