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Being new to this sport im still learning the techniques of casting. I do occasional practice but im still havin a lot of trouble. My main problem is that my shoulder and hand get tired very quickly and more often than not the fly and leader tend to all fall in the same spot. Any suggestions for practice exercises and solutions to my problems???

Thanks,
Tyler

Fish On!!!
 

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"My opinion and 50 cents wouldn't buy you a half a cup of coffee..."

Ty,
With that said first, I would like to say that I have been casting a fly for twenty years now, and I still get sore if I put the rod down for an extended amount of time. Fortunately, for me, that is not too often, but I've felt your pain. Solution would be not to let those muscles used, associated with fly fishing, to rest for too long once you've built them up.:) lol. (That may work on some wives...not mine, she fishes with me.) Anyways, getting seriuos, your title says a lot. Practice does make perfect, no matter what it is. The trouble you are having and the sore muscles will go away, and the fly will straighten itself out. Keep practicing, on your lawn or favorite piece of water, also have someone watch your cast, they may see something you could do differently. Read, watch, ask, and never stop.
Have fun! -glen
 

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Patrick
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You may be moving your upper arm or shoulder to much while casting. I had that trouble when I first started to learn to cast myself if I remember back. Tired arms are often a sign of to much movement of the arm instead of letting the rod do the work. Often I would guess it is unlearning your musles to cast a spin rod. It takes some time working on 10 & 2 and keeping the elbow steady at the same time. It took me I think about a month or two of casting only the fly rod without touching a spin rod to get it down. So just keep working at it. You will get it down. :)
 

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Just an Old Man
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The thrill is not in the kill---But to let them go.

Glen,I need to ask you a question. Are you the same Bartolotti that was on here about a year ago and just seemed to disappear. The one that knows Pilchuck creek like the back of his hand. If it is welcome back.

Jim:thumb
 

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Just an Old Man
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The thrill is not in the kill---But to let them go.

I had the same problem this summer. It was like having tennis elbow. I learned to relax and the problem just seemed to disappear. Just don't over do it build up a little each day. I find it's like lifting weghts,don't over do it.

Jim
 

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One thing you might consider is getting an hour with a casting instructor. A good one can shave months off your learning curve. Inquire about it at your local fly shop and they can set you up...not too expensive...probably only about $25-30.

-Crock
 

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Ty, there are various reasons why you find casting to be tiring. You might be trying to cast a 4-weight line with a 7-weight rod, or flies too heavy for your tackle. But let's assume that you're properly equipped. Having taught more than a few beginners, I've noticed that a beginner is often quietly fighting anxiety. He just can't believe that he can keep this high-wire act from crashing. :eek:
No doubt you've tangled the line, broken off flies on your backcast, thrashed the water in front of you, etc. Subconsciously, you're tensed up, thinking that another disaster is about to strike. The solution is practice and experience, and if you can get it, good coaching. In time you'll realize that a good backcast followed by a good forward cast is just physics at work, not a miracle.
As for piling up line, it's a matter of insufficient energy for the amount of line you're working. That 40-foot cast that piled up would have straightened out nicely if you'd put the same energy into a shorter cast. So: baby steps. Learn to consistently make good shorter casts before trying to make longer ones. (I know; casting long distances is healthy fun, and I like to see my backing knot when I'm fooling around. But depending on the setting, you can catch a lot of fish from thirty feet away.)
 

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the past lousy salmon year gave me te opportunity to better my casting. Here are a things that I noticed with my own casting, in addition to the above

1. Clenching up way to much - losen your grip, get the correct grip, relax your shoulders.
2. In order to do this, you need to back off the power - I get tired forcing it way way too much, which leads to exponentially poorer casts. Forcing casts simply don't work in the long run - note that I do not mean using techniques such as hauling to speed up the line - which do work. See #4
3. for practicing, use a small hunk of yarn - casting a large hunk will make life more difficult to begin with
4. The power occurs at the end of the cast once it has been slowly accelerated - it's timing that will come from doing it. I used to throw shotput - the only way you can get distance is to accelerate the shot slowly to a final burst of power just before the release - same with the fly line.
5. Your rod tip needs to travel in a horizontal line parallel to the ground. Over powering at the end of a cast causes your rod tip to dip down, directing your cast at the ground.
6. until you get comfortable with basic casting, don't single or double haul or try to shoot miles of line etc - I find it adds confusion and frustration. Get the basics knocked down first.
7. I approach it as pure physics - that helped me take the mystique out of it. Lefty kreh has good diagrams in his advanced fly fishing book of the physics applied to the cast.

Jim W
 

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Same Bartolotti. I was off the net for computer reasons, fished a lot. This site is my favorite, and I'm glad to be back. About 1,000 more members than I remember; but, still the same great information any fly angler could benifit from. Thanks for the welcome, and Pilchuck and I are still close:)
I agree with you about the "working-out" comparison in you're response. The motion, combined with resistance, and you are going to have tired muscles at first. Man, I just paused long enough to gather one more comparison, and I can keep it in the fly fishing field... Leg muscles: after the first day of not finning all winter; or, triceps, after the first day off not rowing for a while. It is like pumping iron. It hurts and ibuprofen helps!!:)
Thanks,

Glen
 

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Just an Old Man
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The thrill is not in the kill---But to let them go.

I know what you mean. You can be moving along and doing real good and if you get out if rhythm all hell breaks loose. I did the very same thing this morning. I got so mad I thru the whole thing(rod) in the river. When everything is working right you can really sling some line out there.

Jim
 
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