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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some advice for Purdy bridge. Is low or high tide preferred? And is incoming or outgoing better? I think I may have this backwards but I believe Jacob at GHFS told me to fish behind the restaurant for outgoing and fish the spit side for incoming. Could someone please confirm if this is right?

Also, which side of the bridge is fishable? Can I fish on north and south sides of the bridge? Should I be fishing the lagoon or the bay? What flies do you recommend?

I'm new to fly fishing and the area so be gentle with me and bear with me if I ask some follow up questions.

- Augy
 

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Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
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Very much agree with what XP said.
Being new to fishing the salt, try and fish as much and as many tidal phases as possible.
You'll soon start seeing patterns as to which tides fish best on certain beaches.

The place you asked about is a good place to catch your first searun cutthroat. It also gets hammered due to it being so easy to access.
I've seen four people there the last two Saturdays I've driven by and up to nine people in the past.
Once you've caught a few fish there, expand your horizons as there are a lot better beaches to fish.

A gazetteer and google earth will be your biggest help.

Good luck,
SF
 

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Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
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5,673 Posts
I have only fished Purdy a little bit. I agree with the observation that you should fish there at different stages of tide, from a variety of positions. Don't get stuck in one spot all of the time. Each season will have advantages and disadvantages that you will learn as you gain experience. That's really the best way. Some anglers will spend years, decades even, learning a relatively small piece of water. You can't expect them to give all of that up to someone online. I will give you some good advice though, about that spot. The last time that I was there, there were some "Tweakers" there, hanging around, smoking dope under the bridge, stalking the parking lots, prowling, etc. Take care to keep your valuables to a minimum, and well secured, hidden and locked up. Park your vehicle out in the open. Pay attention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Fished Tuesday and Wednesday in the afternoon at the tail end of the outgoing tides. The mighty SRC still eludes me but I'm determined to figure them out. Ended up with this. My glorious first saltwater fish on the fly. I'm going to call a mulligan on this one if ya'll don't mind. ;)

Saw a few jumpers but I had no idea what to do with them. One of them I swear cleared about 6 feet out of the water. Pretty awesome sight.

 

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Tidewater Enthusiast
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Seriously though man I bet when you felt that little tug from the bullhead your heart missed a beat.... that happens. Welcome to the game.

Just wait until you have fished for 4 straight hours and then suddenly foul hook an enormous rock sole and are pretty certain it is a 20 inch SRC bulldogging on you bro... that sucks....

I have also shit my pants with excitement only to land (10 minutes later) a 30 foot strand of bull kelp riding in a strong tide.... and as for those bullheads they do get big man and some beaches are teeming with them.... you have been warned.... tight lines and stay the course amigo.... ST
 

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Should be OlympiaFarq now...
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The mighty SRC still eludes me but I'm determined to figure them out.
I was in your shoes last winter. It took me four months to finally land one (don't let that discourage you - I was fishing beaches around Seattle - the Kitsap Penninsula is a FAR better place to be). The first SRC I landed was probably the most satisfying fish I've ever caught.
 

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previously micro brew
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Keep at it, and it will happen. I had one day where I must have been throwing the starry flounder special....

Try some different beaches, visit the local fly shops, be patient. If you are lucky, you may also get into some rezzies
 

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Should be OlympiaFarq now...
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436 Posts
Keep an eye on the shore birds, too. If you see them diving, they're going after the same food as the SRC. I often see birds bringing up small fish at the same time that I'm getting hits on my fly.
 

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I do not fish Purdue for reasons already stated. When I first got into SRC's just a couple of years ago, I checked it out and found it quite crowded which did not appeal to me. Best advice I can give (which other have given already) is get a map fire up google and check out as much public access water as you can. There is a lot of water to check and much of it is not pressured. I caught my biggest SRC to date off a beach 3 miles from my house just this past fall after 3 years of targeting these fish. Never tried that beach because it has about 100 feet of shoreline access. Now it is a a go to spot when I have an hour to kill for high quality (not quantity) fish.

Keep at it and you'll figure it out. I cannot remember the last time I got skunked when chasing SRC's specifically and more often than not, they are bycatch when chasing other species like salmon....I great little treat on a slow salmon day.

Oh, and purchase a boat if some kind if you can. It have one- nothing crazy (I bought a fishing kayak). Opens up a lot more water!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I got out today for a few hours. I nabbed 1.5 cohos. (lost one while netting). Believe it or not, I got them off a totally experimental fly that I tied for the very first time using my daughter's crafting supplies and parts from a Christmas tree ornament. lol. Finally nailing one at Purdy was exciting but getting it off a fly I tied myself made it all the more satisfying. I've been dreaming up what other flies I can tie using stuff around the house. :D
 
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