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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the process of setting up a couple of rods exclusively for Saltwater use. I deciced to do a 5pc, Fast action 9' 6wt for SRC's, Dolly's, and Small Salmon with a Ross Canyon #2 for the first rig, and the second is a 4pc., fast action 9' 8wt for Larger Salmon and Steelhead with a Able Super 8 as the other.

My question is do I need to buy a Saltwater specific line? I have a good verity of multi tip line systems for Freshwater, and want to know your opinions on utilizing the tips from the other lines I have, and just making up a couple of main lines to use in conjunction with the tips.

I'm not sure of the make-up of the saltwater lines, but can't help to think that the coatings must have some differances to withstand the harsher saltwater , and the rougher enviroment as well.

I think that you all know by now that I am a tight ass when it comes to buying new gear at retail, and in effort to keep my reputation, I would rather utilize what I already have, if it's a realistic thing to do.

So, I place myself at your mercy and ask for your forgiveness for my lack of wisdom in the Saltworld. Just don't beat me too badly, or I might never be able to face you all again.
:bawling
 

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Steve Daley - West Seattle Denizen
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As I understand it, one of the major differences between saltwater and freshwater lines has to do with the stiffness of the core.

For the most part, since saltwater lines are often used in the tropics when fishing for bonefish and tarpon they need to bee a bit stiffer to stand up to the heat. Freshwater lines tend to become a little too limp when used in 90+ degree heat.

Because you would be targeting species in more temperate areas, I don't know how much of a difference this would make.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
"Because you would be targeting species in more
temperate areas, I don't know how much of a difference
this would make"

That's not the case here, I'm lucky if I get a trip to Wenatchee, let alone somewhere Tropical:bawling

I guess I should have been more specific as to where the rods would be used, My bad. The water I'll fish is surrounding Washington State, both the Coastal waters and interior Puget Sound:smokin
 

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Mtlhead - I've been using two types of lines for each of my saltwater rigs. They've served me well fishing Puget Sound for the past 15 years. I like a standard floating line with a shooting head for days when the silvers or pinks are all over the surface. When I can't find them on top, I switch to a 20' or 25' sink tip (Teeny T-300).

Beware if you choose to go with the sink tip. Over the years I've hooked into a few kings unexpectedly (even landed a few!)and broke my rod on two occasions (my fault both times because I tried to add too much drag to slow them down). Because of that, I only use a 9 WT outfit when fishing the sink tip.

Good luck and welcome to the saltwater club. You'll find there's a lot of open space and a lot more fishing opportunities than you might have thought.:beer2
 

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I am also setting up two saltwater systems. One for the cutts, the other for Coho, Steelhead or anything else that size. I'm going to use RS2 reels and I'll have to use my 8wt for now and maybe my spey rod. The lines should be a clear intermediate or floating. All of them designed for cold saltwater. The striper bass tapers are made for cold water. The blue water lines will be too stiff for around here. As far as a spey system, I'm looking into the Airflo shooting head with the braided floating running line. The shooting heads would be intermediate sink at 45 ft. They also come in 30 foot shooting heads. As I understand it, tossing it in the traditional spey method does not fair to well. Back on the east coast, they use the underhanded method or just an overhead cast on their two handed rods. The end of their shooting heads may have up to 20 feet of leader.

All of that may be useless though as most of the cutts will take a fly within the 50 foot range and the larger fish are only in the estuaries for a short period of time.

I am more focused on getting my fiberglass boat seaworthy enough to run on open water. Motor, lights, registration numbers and safety equipment. All the fly line in the world wont help if I can't get past the no trespassing signs.

Matt

"Everyday that you wake up and decide not to go fishing...is one less day you'll go fishing." Forrest Maxwell
 

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About the only suggestion I can make about lines is to pick up a clear intermediate or clear-tip for your six weight. Searuns do seem a bit spooky at times, and these lines may help.

However, if I were getting ready for the salt experience, I would very seriously consider a fast four-weight for tossing dries. Cutts are suckers for surface presentations. And a four-weight with plenty of backing will handle the odd coho you'll hit.

Be aware that your life is about to change. Fishing in the salt becomes very addictive very fast.

Keith
 
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