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My other car is a fly rod.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking of replaceing the 100 yds of Cortland #20 backing with the Micronite super thin #20 backing. I want to add another 50 yds to the backing capacity.

Does anyone have experience with the Micronite backing? Are there any cons with this?

BTW, I would backing the line up with a nail knot for freshwater use.
 

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Toney,
I think you might be better off with 30lb. or 40lb. Micronite. I know that with most brands, the diameter of 50lb. gel spun polyethylene backing is roughly equivalent to 20lb. Dacron backing.
If you replace 20lb. Dacron (micron) with 20lb. GSP you will probably more than double your capacity, but the nail knot is likely to strip your line and you may suffer the other disadvantages one experiences with extremely thin backing (biting into itself and binding up, cutting yourself…) Since you aren't that hungry for capacity you will probably find it easier to work with 30lb. or 40lb.
Anil
 

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My other car is a fly rod.
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111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, after doing a little more research, I'm coming to the same conclusions. Getting the backing on by the shop guy is one thing. He'll wind it on tight, which is especially important for micronite and gsp, maybe even overlapping the line as it's being wound. BUT on the water, after a one fish takes you into the backing, you won't get the backing back on correctly for the next fish. (OK, I'll never see TWO steelhead in one day.)

I think I'm going to stay with my 100 yards of 20# dacron backing for now for steelhead and think about it some more.
 

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Piscatorial predilection
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Toney,

When was the last time you actually ran out of backing? I can tell you that getting a fish back under control even with 70 to 80 yards of backing off the reel can be difficult. 100 yards of backing equals 300ft PLUS another 90ft of flyline I don't mean to question your ability or skill, but, I would think that 390ft would be more than enough to handle ANY Washington steelhead. If it's not, then perhaps that is not the real problem. I see a lot of chatter on here about "Catching" a steelie...not so much about how to handle one once it's caught, that knowledge, gained through experience or hands-on training, makes 150 yards of backing a moot point.

LB
 

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Getting into the backing depends upon a couple of things, how big and strong is the fish and if its running upstream or down stream and pound test of your tippet. If you have let's say an eight pound tippet and you have a smaller steelhead on you can get him in rather quickly. If you are fishing with a 4X or 5X tippet and get into a ten lb steelhead it may take forever to get him in and you may get into the backing quite long way. Personally I don't believe I have ever got into the more than 30 or 40 ft. even with a large fish and a smaller tippet. If you never fish a larger tippet than lets say 10 lb test then your backing need not be any stronger than fifteen lbs. In other words the decision how much backing and the poundage of the backing depends upon how you fish. Make the adjustments on your own fishing habits.

Keith
 

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I used to have Micronite on several of my saltwater reels, and still have it on a few but in general I don't like it. A couple of things:
1) You can get some really nasty finger cuts when a fish runs because the diameter is so thin.
2) It is not comfortable to reel in Micronite with a long line; no leverage, tough to grab, etc.
3) Do you really need the extra capacity? I catch my share of steelhead most years; it's exceptionally rare that a fish gets more than 100 yards into backing.

Given #1 and #2 I only have Micronite left on 2 reels that I use for bluewater fishing where a fish really could get into wacky amounts of backing. I even think it's a waste for bonefishing.

Just use a reel with enough capacity.
 

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I would also say that while I have confidence in my nail knots (and yours) I would never use one with micronite. I would "only" use a bimini looped double, looped to the end of the fly line.
 

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Toney,

Another vote for just sticking with the 20# dacron (or Cortland micron) you already have on your reel. Where are you steelheading that you're gonna' need more than 100 yd of backing? The Thompson and Dean are the only two rivers that come to mind where an angler might actually need more.

Sg
 

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My other car is a fly rod.
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the good advice. No, I don't fish the Dean. I'm going to stick with the Dacron for now, and look into braided fishing line. Mainly, I don't want to deal with micronite fibers. My kite uses this kind of material, and it's dangerous stuff. I could learn how to tie a bimini, but I'd probably hang myself in the process. OH, and no more yellow backing, just white. I don't like the line stains.

Cheers,
 
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