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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been trying to figure out what exactly a "Hoh bo" fly is; it seems, like so many patterns, there are lots of variations, and that's cool. One of the video's I watched (In The Riffle) the fly is tied on a 40 mm shank yet the tier uses wire (intruder wire?) fastened to the shank and the tailing eye of the shank is unused except the tier uses the tail eye in the vice. Am I missing something, why not use a hook, in lieu of the shank with the hook bend cut off after tying?

If any of you steelheaders, who tie the Hoh bo (or similar) and feel like sharing your recipe, it would be appreciated! So thank you in advance.
 

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I’m a whale
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shanks are used for weight and tying wider profile flies..the material lays out better and the shape *(broad heads) form easier. the hobo and intruder are only different from the visual aspect of 2 flared heads for an intruder, and 1 head for a hobo if that makes sense :) ...and hobo's tend to be slender and sparse. .as opposed to the kitchen sink intruders..my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
"You mean why do you cut off the hook? For single barbless hook situations if that's why you are asking"

I wasn't very good in my description - I have been attempting to tie intruder style flies using old Mustad 36890-4, the hook gets cut off at the top of the bend after I tie the fly with the trailing hook fastened to what remains of the old Mustad.

Bhudda - thanks for the explanation, makes sense (sort of) ;-) The Hoh bo's I've tied today, when wetted, are slender but they do look pretty cool. Now if there were only a few more options to swing 'em..... it sure doesn't seem likely that the upper Columbia tributaries are going to open but one can always "hope".
 

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so Buzzy..the hobo swims with big head flare and tapered end...intruder swims with big head flare, sparse middle and big butt flares:) thats what I meant to say!
also the shanks I use are single shank, not the double Waddington style, pack off 100 spinner wires cut in half for under 10$.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks bhudda heffe'! I tied ten of some mix of "hobo" flies - the black n blue looks very cool, also tied some up in black and orange (trick or treat!). Looking forward to their slim profile enticing steel the middle of next month (well, hoping anyway). Thanks for your help.
 

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From: Tyler Kushner on http://www.speypages.com/speyclave/95-hooks-feathers-floss/20718-intruders.html

So many variations on this fly. Saw some incredibly beautiful intruders tied up for the Dean a few days ago! I tend to tie mine sparse, while others bulk them up a bit. I use Wadington shanks typically, but have tried other shanks and big hooks for the body. I prefer shanks over tubes personally.

Bill

Here are the instructions for the Intruder - have fun!

The Intruder
by Ed Ward


Hook:

I tie this on a tube - usually 21/2 - 3" long and use a short-Shanked
Partridge Nordic Single Spey #4

Ed uses quite a complicated but ingenious method. The fly itself is tied on a straightened and cut-off 2/0 Mustad 36890 and the trailer hook is a #1 or 2 Diachii 2451. He then ties a loop of 25lb mono 1/4" from the tip of the hook. Tie in oval gold tinsel and take 2 wraps in back of the loop and 1 in front (this flares the loop out).

Rear hackle:

Tie in a long, soft, black hackle and take 3 wraps

Feelers:
Tie in 9 strands of dyed orange ostrich plume on each side of the fly. Tie in dyed orange ringneck pheasant tail and take 3 or 4 turns.

Body:
Tie in a long skinny badger hackle and leave hanging. Tie in burnt orange chenille and wrap forward to within 1/2" of the eye of the hook. Wind the badger hackle forward ending with 3 successive turns at the point at where the chenille ends. Spin a small clump of black deerhair (this flares the front hackle) trim butts flush with the shank. Tie in orange ringneck pheasant tail and take 3 or 4 turns.

Shell:

Tie in 2 cree hackles on each side of the shank for "wings." Tie in dyed orange guinea hackle and take 4 or 5 turns.

Head:

Tie in a small ball of black chenille. Tie in lead eyes. Whip finish. Cover head with Aquaseal thinned with Cotol.

Tying note 1:

Ringneck pheasant tails are split down the stem with a single-edge razor, so they can be wrapped as a hackle. Soaking the tail for 10 minutes in warm water can aid in the splitting and wrapping process. Now I soak my tails in water with a dollop of hair conditioner in it overnight. Then I start at the top and strip the fibres from each side of the stem - it works great - the conditioner keeps the feather supple enough to wrap even after it is dry.

Tying note 2:

Other species of pheasant tail produce different appearances. Amherst is striking and I have used Silver pheasant.

Tying note 3:

Try any colour combinations you like!

Rigging the Intruder

Ed rigs this like the British "needle-fly." Pass your leader through the eye of the hook, then through the mono loop, then through a 1/4" long piece of 16 gauge electrical wire from which the wire has been removed. Tie the leader to the hook with a non-slip loop knot. Push the electrical insulation up onto the end of the hookshank and slowly pull on the leader to draw the knot snugly into the other end of the insulation, making everything pulls together with the hook point riding up.

I tie on tubes and it eliminates the complicated rigging, the same could be accomplished on a Waddington shank. Originally Ed tied this on a large regular hook but was unhappy with the holding power as well as the potential for injuring fish and went to his present method.

I think that this is a brilliant pattern. It has a great profile and fantastic movement. As a steelhead pattern it is not a pattern everyone like - almost solely because of its huge size. I have always been partial to big flies for steelhead so it was not tough for me to accept!

I have begun to experiment with various colours and feathers, Ed himself says he rarely ties 2 the same - so have at it!
 

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I like tubes better than shanks, more control of hook position for solid hook ups. Plus I don't like weight on my steel head flies.
 
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I like tubes. I like shanks. I like clipped front hooks as shanks. All can be weighted or not. All can be sparse but flowing. A good dubbing or hair ball beneath the broad head materials helps for the flowing profile.
 
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ok..secret weapon style...im a retired hairdresser...ive styled many a bald women's head to give " lift"....tie everything in backwards..meaning instead of hair flowing toward the bend of shank..tie with flow towards hook eye, when wet and folded over..it will umbrella out, if u will.
I'm doing this as well
 
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