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· I’m a whale
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schmokin'reel


rattlesnake lake- westside


hey fellas i for some reason cant download the wfwd regs. and i have lost my regs pamphlet recently and was wondering if anyone had their's handy if they could tell me when the open is for this lake. i believe its the last weekend in april ? or the first? please any info would be helpful, i have the day off tomorrow and its local ,thanks - bhudda:smokin
 

· Be the guide...
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Anyone been out to Rattlesnake lately to check it out? Last year at this time it was so low that you could almost throw a rock accross. They didn't end up stocking it until the levels came up quite a bit.

It is suprising how many gear and fly fisherman pound this lake. It is just about as crowded as many of urban bait fishing lakes. And many of the fisherman still insist on taking home their limits. I'm not really against that, but I would prefer a limit decrease or make this a C&R lake. I think it would cut down on the poaching by the power baiters and allow more triploid carry-overs. Denying that you and your buddies used bait to fill your 5 gallon bucket with triploids is one thing (when there is a 5 fish per person limit), but trying to hide a 5 gallon bucket full of fish that aren't supposed to be retained no matter what was used to catch them - well, that will be harder (not impossible, but harder).
 

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ChadK:

We both know Rattlesnake Lake and its massive fluctuations. It is damn near devoid of vegetation, and only offers midges/chironomids for the triploids palate. A friend of mine once caught a sucker, suggesting that there might be small suckers triploids could feed on, but that's just speculation.

So, you C & R these fish/lower the limits, and what do you get: Lots of triploids that die in mass of starvation by the limited food supply the lake fails to offer. Would it make you feel more comfortable that they died in that manner, than harvested by meat-fishermen? Its definitely not as much of an eyesore when they starve to death, but the results are the same.

Sparse
 

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The lake was super low, but started coming up about a month ago. She's about full now. Last summer, for the hell of it, I slapped on a mask and snorkel and swam around the shallows. Saw a ton of baitfish-couldn't get ahold of one for ID purposes, but maybe redside shiners? So there is some food for trout if they get big enough to start eating fish.
 

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I've seen lots of tiny fish that I think may be young cutthroat. I've seen the cutthroat at least trying to spawn in one of the small tribs. It was quite a site - I saw hundreds of trout from 4 to 10 inches crammed in the creek and any little indentation (more than a few inches) was packed with fish. In a few places, there were holes carved into the clay creek bottom and these little bowls were so thick with trout you could probably stick your hand in and grab a bunch. Anyway - If they successfully spawn, their offspring could serve as food for any big fish.

Also, the low lake levels tend to be during winter \ spring when the weather is cool. The warm summer months usually find the lake at full capacity. I can't imagine the varying lake levels impacting the fish that much - other than making them easier targets for the eagles and ospreys and other predators. I've seen many lakes in BC and in the alpine regions where bows, cutthroats, and brookies were so thick they were clearly over-populated. In many cases it was clear that the smaller and weaker fish that had trouble competing for food ended up feeding the larger fish. At anyrate, if the lake had trouble supporting a certain amount of fish, the WDFW would could just cut back on the numbers it stocks to provide higher quality fish as a sustainalble level. I bet the fish would not grow as fast as on the east side, but they would still grow and provide a better fishery than they do now if we gave them a chance.

As I think about it, what would it be like if it actually turned out to be a quality fishery? Who would want to travel to the eastside to fish those rattlesnake and tic infested areas when they could stay close to home and catch quality trout? The crowds would be crazy. Maybe I like it better as it is...:dunno
 

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In an effort to create more quality fishing opportunities in western Washington and save all you guys the burden of gas money, camping trips, etc.., I have come up with a pretty good plan.

I suggest that you start hitting up the local biologists to stock Tzenziacut Rainbow Trout. "What the hell is that?" You ask. Its a type of Rainbow trout that BC stalks in its Caribou-Chilcotin coast area. The weather there is rainy and crappy like Seattle and the lakes are acidic/tanic (tea colored) like Seattle's. The waters are full of Minnows, (like Pass Lake and now apparently Rattlesnake Lake). These fish actually prefer minnows and ambush minnows in tree-falls like brown trout do.

Theory in practice: Take any crappy Western WA mudhole lake with no outlet and fill it full of black-nosed dace, chub minnows, shiners, etc.. and add 14" Tzenziacut Rainbow Trout for year one. If this thing has a inlet you might even be able to get some "natural" reproduction. Problem solved. You will never have to fish in the desert or Okanogans again.

Read Flyfishing BC, ed. Karl Bruhn to learn more about Tzenziacut Rainbow Trout.

Streams are made for the wise man to contemplate and fools to pass by.
(Sir Izaak Walton)
 
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