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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I'm new here, just joined this morning, and moved to Ames Lake last fall. I got into Fly Fishing rivers about 20 years ago because a friend's family was big into it. Lost touch with the friend and stopped the hobby but kept all my gear. Now that I can be on the water with less than 5 minutes notice, I'm trying to get back into the hobby. I won't say I was good, or anything above a novice, at the sport when I was younger, but I know absolutely nothing about fly-fishing on a lake. I've caught several trout, blue gill and perch by trolling with a spinner, but I'd really like to be fishing with my fly rod. So far, I've only caught perch by trolling the edges of the lily pads. Easy and fun, but I'd like to do more and trolling with a fly rod just feels wrong.

Anyway, first suggestion is gear. I'm still using my old 9' 5wt Lamiglas. This wasn't bad for the Yakima or Cle Elum, but is that an appropriate rod for a lake? What line should I be using as well? I have no idea what my current sink line is, but I figure the stuff is cheap so I should just toss it get and something new, but I'm not sure what to get. Leaders? I have some 10' 6lb leaders that I'm sure will work for even the biggest trout I can get into (biggest I've caught by trolling was 13-14", neighbor said the biggest he's ever caught was maybe 16") but I'm not sure what to expect if I get into bass or even the land locked salmon a couple of people have suggested exist here.

As for casting... without moving water, what do I aim for? Casing near a shore is tricky with the lily pads so I've tied a few woolly buggers with weed guards and we'll see how effective that is.

Last, fly suggestions. I know I'm supposed to look around for the bugs flying around, but seriously I've never been able to do this. I see tiny little bugs about the size of a gnat and dragon flies. I have no idea how to translate that knowledge into what fly I should be using under the water. I go by trial an error and so far, woolly buggers seem to work.

As for advise level, think of me as a guy who grew up not fishing or camping, then 20 years ago bought some gear and tried fly fishing about a dozen times over a couple of years and then dropped the hobby until now. In those dozen fishing trips I only caught a couple of fish. So, I know the basic components and probably a few bad techniques and won't get offended at extremely basic advise. I'll probably ask some stupid questions as well.


I'm here to learn :)
Thanks,
Matt
 

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Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
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If you search the Stillwater and fly tying forums, you'll find a ton of useful info. Look at some of the lake fly swaps as well.
Pay special attention to these guys, Irafly, Troutpocket, Tim Lockhart, Starman77. These guys have the lake scene dialed in.
SF
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all, those are some good links. I'd seen that topographical map and was trolling the 25' area because I'd been told the trout go for the deeper cooler water, but I guess that's not the exactly the case. With what appears to be a very gentile slope in most places, where would the shoal be? The entire north half of the lake?
 

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FishyJere
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I have some generic advice about home waters: fish it a lot, try a lot of different things (not all at once, just one at a time) and chat up anyone who seems to be onto the fish. Your expectation should be that it takes a fair amount of time, say years, to explore the place, its seasons and inhabitants.

When you happen on something that works, make notes and do little experiments/variations around the successful item. Look around and note the season, weather and hatches. Don't be afraid to tie plenty of flies that do not work and get thrown away.

It flat takes a while to learn a lake well enough to be elected Mayor. Even then, you crash and have to begin the experiments again because the lake is always changing.
 

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FishyJere
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Shoals are where it comes up from deeper water. The depth fish are at on any given day depends... Depends on dang near everything. You have to know the bottom so you can try out different stuff at different depths, at different speeds, etc.

Fish are in cooler (deeper) water when it is hot, just like you seek air conditioning.

Like I said, it is a lifelong pursuit. DO NOT GIVE UP, you live on a lake for crying out loud! Get a Coot to come fish with you - pay him in beer.
 

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oh yeah!
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I used to fish Ames Lake 8-10 times a year. Starting in late Spring. The State dumps about 6,000 catchables in the lake, but it gets a lot of early activity. By mid summer, the trout are down the end by the Girl Scout camp. Must be a spring there since they concentrate in the area. There is another spring that comes in North of the put-in area along the shoreline. I would not waste too much time fishing it other than the area by the Girl Scout camp. Use green or black wooly buggers that immediate leeches. Slow trolls. Usually the fish are within 10-15 feet at this time of year. Fall fishing gets better. Some really big carry-overs are in the lake so it is worth fishing. Yes and it also has some bass.
 

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I used to fish Ames Lake 8-10 times a year. Starting in late Spring. The State dumps about 6,000 catchables in the lake, but it gets a lot of early activity. By mid summer, the trout are down the end by the Girl Scout camp. Must be a spring there since they concentrate in the area. There is another spring that comes in North of the put-in area along the shoreline. I would not waste too much time fishing it other than the area by the Girl Scout camp. Use green or black wooly buggers that immediate leeches. Slow trolls. Usually the fish are within 10-15 feet at this time of year. Fall fishing gets better. Some really big carry-overs are in the lake so it is worth fishing. Yes and it also has some bass.
BobA
I believe your thinking of Langlois that get planted.
I think Ames is a private lake with private access west of Langlois.
PS
I would fish it if it had a launch I could get my pram in. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Your right... there is no real access to Ames Lake....that was Langolis I mentioned when I lived in Carnation.
Haa I asked my wife where the Girl Scout camp was. We were both puzzled.

I took off from work a bit early today and stopped by Creekside in Issaquah to pick up a few things. I might head out in a bit once there's some shade on the lake.
 
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