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What do the red beads on some lake flys immitate? are they just attactors? I have had lots of success with the fly pattern that is well known to lake fishermen in washington (red bead, olive maraabou tail, olive chenille body and Pheasent rump for the soft hackle). If you know the pattern I'm talking about...what does it immitate? a damsel? I interested in all of your thoughts on different colored beads and what they help immitate?
-Marc
 

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Who knows what trout think? I've always liked to think up something for their behaviour though.
Think about this one. Red beads may be mistaken for a salmon, steelhead or trout egg. The bug (damn his nasty little butt) has swiped this egg and now is making off with it. Time to move in for the kill. Eleventh commandment (fish only), "He that stealeth an egg shall be eaten alive." Trouts 2:16
Bob:rolleyes
 

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The red beads on the long line of "Willie" flies represent: "Eat me! Eat me! Dude, I don't look like the other bugs. Put me in your mouth and see for yourself what I taste like."

Fish inspect everything with their mouths, you see. For they have no hands..

Sparse

Streams are made for the wise man to contemplate and fools to pass by.
(Sir Izaak Walton)
 

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I've used clear beads on trout nymphs in rivers to imitate the air bubble that the nymph uses to rise to the surface.

I've used orange beads, and I believe there is a popular lake pattern here, the name escapes me, that uses an orange bead...

I've tried green beads with some decent success when tying caddis pupa for fishing rivers, never tried one in a lake.

worldanglr
http://www.worldanglr.com/

Calling Fly Fishing a hobby is like calling Brain Surgery a job.
-Paul Schullery
 

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I've always assumed that red indicated pre-emergence hemoglobin, an injury, or natural coloration. Regardless, it seems to work. I've replaced the gold rib on a prince nymphs with a blood red thread and had good success.

Pete
 

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It's about contrast

Contrast is one of the key issues in helping a fish see your fly. Oh, by the way, remember that red is one of the first colors to "lose" it's color as depth increases. Varies according to the basic color of the water. Orange stays orange a long time...
 

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It's NOT about contrast

That unamed magic fly with the red bead just works! Almost every lake fish I've landed took that fly....

It's most likely not about contrast ....as a color, Red has a very low contrast ...

Contrast = The value of a color
Value is the grey scale equivalent
Red is a "medium" grey
:professor

Green beads have been much less productive than red for me...

Piscean
 

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I have had most success with red beads-particularly on black wooly buggers-but then I seem to fish that color the most. I also have been experimenting with other color beads, like yellow, green and a very bright green which seemed to work well in Rattlesnake Lake two weeks ago.
My brother, a professional tyer, is experimenting with glass bead bodied dry flies which may actually turn out to be damp flies. Not sure of results on that yet.
 

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It's NOT about contrast

Red's "medium grey"ness is why it doesn't look red for long when you start going deep. Within 7 feet it pretty much turns to "grey". So, your olive and red fly is pretty much an olive and grey fly if you are more than seven feet down...
 

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Not Quite A Luddite, But Can See One From Here
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It's NOT about contrast

RiverFishing

Now I'm REALLY intrigued. I think I can visualize this fly which I've never encountered (still somewhat new to the sport and not done much lake fishing yet). Does anyone have a pic and/or a recipe?
Respectfully and gratefully posted!

Mike

:dunno
 

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The red bead used on the Olive Willy has a silver tinsel lining. So, in my opinion the bead serves an ATTRACTOR role by providing silver flash in the same way that mylar does on a lightning bug. In addition to the bead, the iridescence of the pheasant rump soft hackle gets the fly noticed and the profile is very "buggy." Hell, I'd eat it.

-Crock
 

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I forgot what I was supposed to remember.

This talking about red on flies got me thinnking about the red dragonfly I saw today when I was setting up my kids pool today. First time I ever saw a red one. It came down like it was going to land in it but it just flew off. Have any of you ever seen a red one?:dunno

Jim
 

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Hey, Crockett. Do you like anchovies with your Olive Willies? I do.
It is so difficult to even imagine what trout "see."
Let me just mention one little story here. As an ex-commercial salmon fisherman (I was dunked in a trout stream and was re-born again as a trout fisherman), I often fished water deeper than 300ft. with good success. There is absolute darkness at this depth when the surface water is brown from the upwellings of the bottom. How can fish see at this depth? And don't give me this crap about how they feel the lure. They would pick out green hootchies from all others colors fished (I might troll seven different rigs at this depth with different colors on each leader). When green started to get all the fish, I would quickly changed all hootchies to green. Now all lines would get strikes.
So what roll does color play? Big, I think, in all applications. b:professor
 

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Hey Jim,
I don't go to sleep until after midnight. But I take a little nap after breakfast. Another after lunch. The naps aren't really necessary, just pleasure seeking. I love to sleep in my boat with a bobber on and be awakened
by a squaking reel. Bab:7
 
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