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So I'm in the market for a new vise and think I have it narrowed to the Renzetti Traveler. I don't HAVE to have a rotary, but I think it's a nice option that will help me tie better flies. I'm stepping up from the old Thompson A, so that statement should hold true no matter what.

But here's my question: The model I looked at in a a fly shop today used two thumb screws to adjust and tighten the jaws. Yet, when I go online to Cabelas they offer the same vise with a cam-lever tightener, which I think I would prefer. I think I would get tired of having to constantly use the thumb screws to set and remove a hook. Sidenote: I also liked the simplicity and hook holding of the Regal, but their "rotary" option is not inline from what I saw.

For you Renzetti fans, am I correct that the cam-lever is a better set-up? I could not even find reviews on the thumb screw version, so maybe it's been phased out?

I would prefer to put my money in a local shop, so may have them order the cam-lever style for me if the consensus is that's the best option. Thanks in advance for any feedback.

Tool Fly
 

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Make my day
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Tool, I would go for the cam. much easier to use. And you don't have to reset the jaws to change hooks of the same size.
 

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I would agree, go with the cam. When the cam became available I converted and prefer that mechanism.

Do be careful not to tighten the first screw too much with the cam. I fractured the screw when tightening the cam down in anticipation of spinning deer hair. It's not necessary to be that extreme, it holds hooks well with normal tension.
 

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Formerly tbc1415
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Spend your money wherever you see fit but I believe the difference between the screw and the cam is a non issue. The difference is inconsequential. Either way it takes a split second to tighten the hook in the jaw.
Contrary to popular assumptions you do not have to constantly readjust the jaws of the screw type when using hooks of a similar size. Only when switching to a hook of a much larger or smaller wire size do you have to spend those three seconds to adjust the jaw width using the little knob near the jaw tip. You have to do the same thing with the cam action. Take close look at both of them and you will see that.

Either way they both work really well. Both hold a wide range of hooks without loosening until you want them to.
The difference comes down to design trends to create a sales advantage. It didn't take long for most of the leading vice brands to offer a cam after the first one appeared.

The Traveler is a good little vise that should serve you well for many years. If you want a better vise for the same amount of money buy a used vise in good condition.

TC
 

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has never caught a steelhead... (its sad, I know)
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I agree with Tim. I have the one with the thumb screws (been using it for 15+ years) and it is really no effort to work. If there is a significant difference in price or availability, I think you will still be very pleased with teh thumb screws version. That said, I hear the cam is a nice addition and I will probably get it whenever I finally need a new one...
 

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I have a Renzetti Traveller with a cam lock and pedestal base. It's my only vise and I'm happy with it. I think the cam jaw is a bit more convenient to load and there wasn't any price difference between the two when i purchased mine. However I understand if you want to convert a screw jaw to a cam jaw later it will cost you around $70. I'm sure the screw model works great too.
 

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Exactly. I tie on this vise, but don't use the rotary a ton, but would never go back to a standard vise.
I have a traveler too, with the screw mechanism. There was no cam available when I got it many moons ago. It works great. Anyway, I find I use the rotary feature most often to simply look at the other side of my flies.
 

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I was in the same boat as you. I opted for the Renz. Traveler because I thought I'd use the rotary option quite a bit for palmered hackles and dubbed bodies. However, I don't use it for much more than turning the fly around for better access to trim spun deer hair and such. I've used the Regal and have to admit I like it better. The ONLY reason I didn't buy the Regal was that it wasn't an in-line rotary. Ssomething to think about anyway.
 

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I've had my traveler for about 15 years now. I'm a commercial tier and questimate I've tied around 150,000 flies on my traveler. I have replaced the thumb screw twice but other than that have never had an issue with the vice.

Unlike the others who posted before me, I DO take full advantage of the rotary function of the vice. Once one learns how, he/she will wonder why they didn't learn it earlier. Wrapping bodies of chenille or peacock hearl or floss or what ever is a breeze. No more passing the material over/under the hook to the other hand, simply pull tight and spin the vice. Ribs are always equaly spaced once you get the hang of it, and trimming deer hair heads is a breeze as was mentioned earlier.

I love my traveler and highly recommend learning to take full advantage of the rotary function.

CJ. (Cliff)
 

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I had had a renzetti traveller now for 5 years with the cam lock and love it.
Learn to use the rotary, especially for bodies, ribbing and hackles, makes it so much easier, especially on smaller flies.
 
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