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Asked this (or how to fish very small streams) question on a UK based board (http://www.flyforums.co.uk/) and the fellows are now well aware that several folks from our side of the Pond are regular posters. New 'digs' here in White City, Oregon and lots of small streams (all be it the Rogue River is 5 minutes away) and Zero idea how to gear up/fish small waters. Folks were outstanding in the advice passed on; to over generalize, with really small streams over line by one to help roll cast/lay out your leader/fly.

fae

Edit: Also look at the RIO Gold lines.
 

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Remember when you could remember everything?
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Since the original post didn't mention anything about fishing small streams (or even streams at all!) let's not all jump to conclusions and impose our own assumptions about how we might prefer to fish a 3wt rod.

That said, 3wts can be a lot less manageable than heavier weights since they don't load as positively and they're a lot more susceptible to being buffeted around by wind when casting. Not sure at what kind of 3wt you'll be using (ultra-fast rocket launcher, smooth and slow bamboo, or something in between), the distance you'll be fishing or whether your Olympic adventures will also include lake fishing. Long-belly lines are fine since they're a bit easier to roll cast (if that's part of your plan), but then too so are double taper lines.

I've owned a bunch of 3wts including my current 8'9" Sage SP 5-piece. Unless the rod you'll be fishing is a very fast action, I'd start out with a Cortland 333 Peach DT3F. The 333s have been in continuous production for a couple decades or more for one simple reason: they're a great line at an affordable price. Why a double taper? Simple. When you're fishing a 3wt, it's not like you're gonna be banging out 80 foot casts, so the questionable advantage of a WT is offset by the DT's better roll casting and it's double line life. Sure you can buy a long belly line, but at a premium of $15 to $20 more than the 333 with little or no advantage.

If you're making the regrettable decision (IMHO) to buy an ultra-fast 3wt, then by all means overline it with the half-weight heavier WF3 Rio Grande or SA GPX. Or even a WF4F in a non-heavy design like the Cortland 333 Peach, Rio Gold or SA Mastery XPS.

My 3¢ worth.

K
 

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Dues past due
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the advice so far guys.

I'm going to put it on a SAGE SPL 389. And I'm just thinking it will be used for most of what I find in the Olympics, which I'm expecting to be mostly small fish/water with the occasional medium size of each.

And since I have a 50% discount coupon for a RIO line, I'm stoked that the cost will be kept down.
 

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Formerly tbc1415
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As stated by megajumbos the LT is a modified Selective Trout. Basically, they tweaked and renamed the Selective Trout to satisfy the constant demand to offer new product. You may still be able to find the Selective Trout at a few online retailers at deep discount.
The selective Trout is an amazingly versatile line that should work well with your rod. For more info search the forum for Selective Trout as this line has been discussed numerous times in the recent past.

TC
 

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Another vote for 444 Peach, but in a 4 wt. For some of my trout fishing I use a 389-5 SP with a 4 wt 444 Peach. I also like the 4 wt Sharkskin Trout Taper. Tried some 3 wt lines, I preferred the 4 wt on this rod. Most of the fishing I do with this rod is on small streams and I like the way the 4 wt lines load the rod for 20-40' casts. Haven't ever tried a SPL, but from what I understand the action is very similar to a SP.
 
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