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As someone mentioned in a related thread, the road up from near Loomis to Chopaka Lake can be intimidating, as it climbs up an exposed, and ever-higher, cliff face. I've been up and down it many times (including one long-ago debacle when I tried to pull a travel trailer up it with four cylinders). But let's separate fact from anxiety: Do any of you know of anyone ever going over the edge? :eek: Limit your reply to confirmed knowledge, not vague rumor.
 

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Mac,

My dad will no longer go up to Chopaka due to that grade. Well two days ago while fishing there I had an itch to check out a stream in the area. I drove out the other way, meaning I turned right climbing out from the lake and climbed for three additional miles. Take a left at the top, there is a fork and it takes you out to the Toats Coulee Road also. You end up going 5 extra miles but the grade is much more manageable. I was interested in seeing if it would suffice for my dad. There is one relatively nervous section but it is short in comparison without the same type cliff. One would not want to go over the road though.

Even though you do go higher on the mountain before dropping back down the, most of that elevation is gained on Toats Coulee pavement. I honestly do not know why the "other" way is not used by everyone. And it is marked with signs.

What have we all been missing here all these years. In fact the longer way in is maintained. They were grading it while we were there. Anyone at all nervous about the long grade should never go that way. I doubt if I will ever go up or down that gade again. Falling rock all over that face.

Was up for 4 nights and days at the lake with my son and we had a blast. Adult damsels and the "Ceviche emerger" with a Lafontaine variation were the ticket for us.

Mark
 

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I forgot what I was supposed to remember.

Why your dad won't go up there anymore sounds like when we get older,like me. That this thing about heights seems to affect us more. Like an anxiety attack. I've been to doctors and they gave me pills but they don't seem to help. It's like getting an in years and there are certain things that we can't do anymore. To me it pisses off because I can't do what I used to do when I was younger. See what you all got to look foward to when you get older.:p

Jim
 

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I've been going up to Chopaka since the late 60's. I've never heard of anyone going over the cliff, and I've never seen a wrecked vehicle.

Lots of people (including me) used to lose their brakes going downhill, but you can always slow down by using low gear and "ditching" into the hillside. One experience like that & you always have your brakes checked before going up, make lots of stops to keep things cool, and go slow. I think the brakes on newer vehicles are much more reliable than 30 years ago.

Ever since they re-graded the main road in the early 90's, I've taken the short route most of the time.

One thing I always do is stop at the Loomis Store and check to see if they're logging in the area. One time I found out the trucks were using the big grade until 5PM, so I drove around the back way to avoid them.

Tom
 

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Once saw a guy have a trailer wheel hanging over the edge, sitting on the axle. This was probably 15 or so years ago. It was in October and there was snow on the ground. During hunting season you see all kinds of rigs going up and down that road. I do agree that the other way is probably much better than normal. Now if you want to see a scary road stop at one of the overlooks and check out the OLD road going up, on the other side of the canyon onto Grandview. That one looks bad.
kurt
 

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The only really bad part of the road is the first mile (or thereabouts), it's fairly steep and usually washboarded. The right hand side features a long, steep drop to the valley of Sinlahekin Creek. The road isn't narrow and, except for the washboards has a good surface. Soon after you pass the first cattle guard, the angle eases off and it's a piece of cake from there to the lake.
 

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I just returned from my family's annual trip to Chopaka Lake and after 10 years of going we had our first problem. We were packing everything, hooked up our tent trailer and were ready to role. After a final search, my dad noticed the left tire on our tent trailer was flat. We had everything we needed to fix it, but the lug nuts were frozen on. So we couldn't get it off and ended up going down the hill on a flat tire; luckily the tire never fell off so we didn't have to ride on the rim. We got down safely and one of the workers at Garret's Used Car and Truck in Loomis popped the lug nuts off for us. That just proves that the hill is hardly a menace.:professor
 

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I just returned from my family's annual trip to Chopaka Lake and after 10 years of going we had our first problem. We were packing everything, hooked up our tent trailer and were ready to role. After a final search, my dad noticed the left tire on our tent trailer was flat. We had everything we needed to fix it, but the lug nuts were frozen on. So we couldn't get it off and ended up going down the hill on a flat tire; luckily the tire never fell off so we didn't have to ride on the rim. We got down safely and one of the workers at Garret's Used Car and Truck in Loomis popped the lug nuts off for us. That just proves that the hill is hardly a menace.:professor
 
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