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I know they do it on the east coast for stripers but I wonder if anyone does it here for coho. Let's say there is a really good tide in the middle of the night would you fish it?
 

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We work to become, not to acquire.
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All freshwater and marine area are open 24 hours unless noted as closed to night fishing in that area(Pages 26 and 102). The beaches can fish well but it can be a pain with the lack of light unless a beach is near a light source. If you are into it they also have glow in the dark materials that you can charge up with a light source. Haven't tried it but talked to a few locals that have. Hope that helps.
 

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Back east nighttime is the right time to fish the beach for striped bass. It's challenging, and things are always a little scarier in the dark (wading out a long ways to reach a sandbar for instance), but the fish often feed aggressively in shallow water under cover of darkness. If there is some light (full moon, or man-made) black flies can be the ticket as they cut a strong silhouette , and bulkier flies that push water are also good. I think fish see quite well in the dark though, so they will probably hit the same flies you use during the day.
 

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Does 2:30 or 3:00 am count? If so, then yes, I do it sometimes to hit an incoming tide. I'm usually alone or find a gear guy or 2 at most. I used to think that was the best time to find fish close enough to catch them with a fly so that was the only time I went. That was most likely because the first time I went I caught 2 coho and 2 humpies in the 2 hours before sun up. However, I've since found it doesn't matter as much as I once thought. I used the same flies then that I do now with similar results.

A little off subject but the first chum I caught in fresh water was years ago on the Sky. I had been fishing it regularly trying to learn how to catch salmon on my fly rod. I went real early one morning to try to get away from the crowds. I remember spooking a few fish when I walked up to the edge of the water. So I backed off and waited a few minutes while I strung up my rod and tied on a fly. I stood back about 10 feet from the water and flipped enough line out to get my fly to just drift down next to the gravel bar. About the third time I found myself in what started out as a seriously one sided fight. I was lucky enough to not lose the fish and managed to eventually bring it to shore. My fingers got all cut up as I tried to remove the hook from its' jaw. I still remember how surprised I was by how hard the jaw was and how gnarly those front teeth were. I have no idea how large that fish was but I was awed by how heavy, strong, and powerful it felt. When I first got into the fight that fish ran out into the current and just screamed down river. I have no idea why but it then decided to do the same thing and go up river. It did that several times and each trip down and back got shorter and shorter. I remember thinking I was going to have to try to break it off because I'd never be able to land it. That was probably 15 years ago now and I still remember all the details to this day. After I released it I turned around and there were probably 5 gear guys standing there that had watched the entire thing unfold. I reeled up, offered them the run and sat down for a cup of coffee and bagel. I watched them for 3 cups of coffee and saw a couple fish landed. Then I just went home. Very memorable morning. I have no idea what I did the rest of the day.
 

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TD great story and they are that strong so what a great fish to catch and fightI stilll remember myfirst and the next 4or 5 too. They all came out of the same short stretch of river on the same day. My fights weren't as good but what a day!!
 

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Probably 30 years ago a couple of buddies and I were fishing and camping on the Cowlitz below the barrier dam. After a few beers, well maybe more than a few, we went down to the river around midnight with our rods, flashlights, and glow-in-the-dark spoons. (Sorry, this was before I got into fly fishing for salmon.) To get to the point, within a few minutes and for another hour or so we all had fish on. We were running up and down the gravel bar in the dark, stumbling over rocks, getting wet and having the time of our lives. We lost several fish because we often couldn't tell if they were running up or down river. We crossed lines more than once. The largest fish landed was easily 35+lbs. (We had limited that day so released them all.) So, yes you can fish at night and it can be effective. The difficult part is trying to play the fish! The next morning we were all bruised from multiple falls on the rocks. Probably lucky no one broke a leg, arm or rod.
 

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Yup. Sometimes the middle of the night is the only time availble to fish. I use a bit of glow stuff, but not so much that it looks like a light bulb. A strand or two of glow polar fiber just might draw a tad more attention than a natural.
 

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.... If there is some light (full moon, or man-made) .....
iagree
Need some ambient light to make the whole experience a reasonable exercise. Nothing quite like throwing to rise rings in the moonlight.
 

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Since everyone else is necro-posting, I'll dredge this one up. Been going out at night recently, entirely unsuccessfully. Mostly just end up playing with the glowing plankton since my beach doesn't have salmon yet.

Anyone else been trying the night-bite? Getting freaky with the fly under a dark sky?
 

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Water Liquid Jaw Fish Marine biology


Here's one from a unknown spring creek ;)
 
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