Washington Fly Fishing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Indi Ira
Joined
·
9,492 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This weekends rain proved to be too much for my rainwear. I've heard there are products that can be used to re-waterproof products. I'm curious to see who has experience with these products and what they would recommend. Based on product descriptions Revive X seems like a good product.
 

·
The wanted posters say Tim Hartman
Joined
·
2,100 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Irafly

·
Justified
Joined
·
4,940 Posts
Ira, I tried that Revive X combo pack (wash and waterproof). Followed directions to a "T", didn't work for crap, beyond light rain. Soon as it rained even a bit steady, I was wet again. :(

Could it have been my jacket? I honestly don't know, but my jacket was old, but well cared for...
 
  • Like
Reactions: Irafly

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,329 Posts
I was thinking along the same line as @generic wondering if the raingear is the issue. I have several "waterproof" jackets none of which are waterproof despite proper laundering. I'm not going to buy the treatments recommended as I just don't have faith they will work on this junk I have.

Three years ago, while up in BC in June, we hit the worst rain in all the years fishing up there. My old surveyor wear (pvc coated Helly Hansen) was the only thing that worked while sitting in my pram. Uncomfortable jacket but at least the moisture inside the gear was cold sweat and not rain soakin' through.

Good luck!
 

·
Moved to https://pnwflyfish.com
Joined
·
3,286 Posts
Nikwax works well (two part system) and I've heard good things about Granger's stuff recently. That said it doesn't work miracles, so if you're old gear is trashed it likely won't help. Most modern "waterproof" stuff has a membrane that is actually what's waterproof. The DWR on the outside (that you're looking to replenish) is just a secondary barrier and helps keep the outside material from saturating keeping it lighter, aiding in the breathability, and helping to keep water from finding those possible small leaks.

If you're sitting in a pram for an extended period of time in a torrential downpour, old school PVC rain gear is probably your best option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
I use Nickwax on all my Gore tex gear and find that it works really well. I wash my gear with a light dose of soap, run them through a second cycle with no soap to rinse everything thoroughly, then wash with Tech Wash. After that, I run them through another cycle with TX Direct Wash-in to restore the waterproofing. Let let everything dry on a rack or if you need to get your gear ready in a hurry tumble dry low and call it good.

Mike
 

·
Ignored Member
Joined
·
12,111 Posts
I have never washed my rain jacket. It just seems...sacrilegious in some way. I'm sure the fishing gods will be mightily upset with any one who does such a thing. None of you are allowed in my boat...I don't want to be there when the whip comes down!
I wondered what that smell was the last time we fished.
 

·
Geriatric Skagit Swinger
Joined
·
8,260 Posts
This whole thing about washing rain gear...think about that for a second...washing something that is water repellent???...is kind of silly. My rain jacket gets "washed" by rain about half the time I wear it... and damn near every time I wear it in winter. Running the damn thing through the rigors of a washing machine would unnecessary create more wear and tear. Quit washing them! It's the manufacturer's way of getting you to buy another one before you need to.

Staying dry in winter. I actually double up. Under my rain jacket is a hooded waterproof/windproof fleece layer. Absolutely bullet proof against being drenched during the day.

Kerry, it ain't the jacket that smells...
 

·
Moved to https://pnwflyfish.com
Joined
·
3,286 Posts
This whole thing about washing rain gear...think about that for a second...washing something that is water repellent???...is kind of silly. My rain jacket gets "washed" by rain about half the time I wear it... and damn near every time I wear it in winter. Running the damn thing through the rigors of a washing machine would unnecessary create more wear and tear. Quit washing them! It's the manufacturer's way of getting you to buy another one before you need to.

Staying dry in winter. I actually double up. Under my rain jacket is a hooded waterproof/windproof fleece layer. Absolutely bullet proof against being drenched during the day.

Kerry, it ain't the jacket that smells...
Nice idea but it doesn't hold water (couldn't resist). Dirt and grime grinds its way in to the fibers of your rain jacket (think more microscopic level) and displaces or rubs off that DWR coating (the stuff that makes water bead up). After a while the jacket absorbs rather than sheds water. Now if it's a nice Gore Tex or similar jacket it will still be waterproof, but it will be heavier and not breath as well when the outer material is saturated. Rain water will not clean the "pores" of the material.

As for washing, you don't want to use normal detergent as it will strip or reduce the life of the DWR. The two part Nikwax includes Tech Wash that you'll use in place of laundry detergent. Most waterproof stuff will recommend the cold delicate cycle, and if you're still using one of those old top loaders with the rotary blade thing in the middle, you're probably best off washing it by hand. After cleaning the jacket it's time to use the second part which is the waterproofer. You can do it in a bucket by hand or run it in the washer. By hand is a more efficient use of the Nikwax. Once it's done you let it hang dry or tumble dry low. You can also refresh a DWR that's starting to lose it's beading ability by running the jacket through the dryer on low. Imagine that it's heating this coating allowing it to redistribute and fill the "pores" in the material once again.

Every single manufacturer of waterproof gear recommends a process similar to this for ultimate performance and a long life.
 

·
Moved to https://pnwflyfish.com
Joined
·
3,286 Posts
With any of the aftermarket DWR products, keeping your gear clean is the most important part. Regularly wash with a non-detergent soap and it will keep beading water and extend the time before you need to reapply the waterproofing product. If a product says to tumble dry on a specific heat setting, do it. A lot of products are heat activated, so if you skip that step, you're wasting your time and money. Make sure you get the right product for your gear too. Don't just buy the most expensive item in the lineup thinking it's the best. Also, check the date on the bottle. Most of these products have a sell-by date that's a few years after manufacture, and they will start to break down over time. If the bottle you pick up is at or near the sell-by date, it's old and you don't want it.

I worked in that business for 4 years, and saw a lot of the results from side-by-side tests with competitors products. This was back in 1996-2000, but not much seems to have changed in the meantime. The biggest breakthrough that happened back then was the advent of fluorocarbon waterproofing products, such as ReviveX. They performed really well, but it turned out they have some pretty nasty environmental consequences. Everyone knows fluoro tippet is worse than nylon for the same reasons, but you're not spraying it into the air in tiny particles.

Nikwax and Grangers products are the two I've used the most. In the tests we did, Grangers usually performed a little better, but they both make good products. Grangers tends to be a bit harder to find, whereas you can pick up Nikwax at just about any outdoor store.
Beat me to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
One tip I learned from a gear repair professional in Portland. Step one: launder and dry your waterproof/breathable gear according to the label. Step two: go set two kitchen timers for 5-7 minutes. Then put your gear in the dryer on high heat. Don't leave the laundry room. Don't get distracted. Once the garment is really hot, remove from the dryer. It usually doesn't take 5 minutes. The high heat really helps to restore the DWR. Just be super careful to not "over cook" your gear (hence the two timers). If your garments have delicate fabrics, this may not be the best idea. I don't want to be responsible for overbaked gear. :)

It works for me. A few weeks ago we sat in the drift boat stripping flies for fall chinook on a southern Oregon coastal river. Rained for a good 6 hours. My Patagonia River Salt jacket kept me bone dry. Both of my buddies own Simms G3 or G4 jackets. Both of them were wet at days end. YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,299 Posts
While I understand the reasoning for washing and treating these fancy coats, I'm with WW...it just seems silly to me.

I see it like this... if I'm on the water in nasty conditions often enough to warrant the cost of some of these expensive goretex jackets then I'm simply not gonna be wanting to spend time washing, treating, and babying the damn thing. For that reason I sold my Simms jacket and I now have two options... I have a light shell that will keep me dry enough in 95% of conditions.... And real, Grundens rain gear for when I really need it. Neither gets washed, scrubbed, or treated in any way and thats just the way I like it.
 

·
Moved to https://pnwflyfish.com
Joined
·
3,286 Posts
While I understand the reasoning for washing and treating these fancy coats, I'm with WW...it just seems silly to me.

I see it like this... if I'm on the water in nasty conditions often enough to warrant the cost of some of these expensive goretex jackets then I'm simply not gonna be wanting to spend time washing, treating, and babying the damn thing. For that reason I sold my Simms jacket and I now have two options... I have a light shell that will keep me dry enough in 95% of conditions.... And real, Grundens rain gear for when I really need it. Neither gets washed, scrubbed, or treated in any way and thats just the way I like it.
Says the guy that doesn't even rinse his shit off after fishing the salt! :eek: :D Like I said, good waterproof gear will stay waterproof without the extra effort, but it won't perform to its peak potential. In my mind if I'm going to pay for some expensive jacket, I'm going to make sure its living up to the cost by performing as high as possible, or I might as well have something cheap. So I understand how cheap and maintenance free works for you, but for those that drop big bucks on a jacket it's worth the small effort to keep it top notch. I only do this process about once a year for most of my stuff, so it's not a huge burden.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,299 Posts
Says the guy that doesn't even rinse his shit off after fishing the salt! :eek: :D Like I said, good waterproof gear will stay waterproof without the extra effort, but it won't perform to its peak potential. In my mind if I'm going to pay for some expensive jacket, I'm going to make sure its living up to the cost by performing as high as possible, or I might as well have something cheap. So I understand how cheap and maintenance free works for you, but for those that drop big bucks on a jacket it's worth the small effort to keep it top notch. I only do this process about once a year for most of my stuff, so it's not a huge burden.
I would argue that a good set of Grundens doesn't even begin to reach it's peak potential until its been abused for several months. ;)

I guess it just comes down to your own mind set. To me I pay top dollar for certain things simply because I don't want to have to baby them... Others baby the same gear precisely because it was so expensive in the first place. Neither is right or wrong, like most things it's just a matter of personal opinions and outlooks on things.

I will say that if I'm totally honest the only times in my life where I have felt that I truly "needed" quality rain gear is when I've fished as a job and spent 12+ hours on the water day in, day out, for months at a time. Several stints of commercial fishing and this summer spent as deck hand. In both of those situations it was Grundens and nothing else. I tried quite a few other options and nothing has come close to performing as well and holding up to the abuse. Simms wishes they were they tough ;)

Matt did bring up a good point in regards to how you'll use it. IMO for fishing out of a boat I much prefer heavy slickers over a tight cut wading jacket.
 

·
Moved to https://pnwflyfish.com
Joined
·
3,286 Posts
Yeah those Grundens aren't going to be ideal hiking a few miles to get to the fishing because they aren't breathable. The breathable part is what makes something like Gore Tex a compromise and also the reason it needs more maintenance. It's a permeable barrier that needs to allow moisture to pass through one way but block it the other. Kind of tricky stuff. For the record I mostly agree with you, which is why I have pretty inexpensive rain gear and nothing with Gore Tex (other than some boots). For my uses, I've never been able to justify the cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,299 Posts
I've often wondered if the "breathing" aspect was some sort of marketing inside joke.

When I've worn stuff that was "breathable" and I keep my smokes stashed in an inside pocket they end up soaking wet. However when I wear non breathable stuff I can safely and dryly store my smokes. That tells me all I need to know. Priorities baby lol
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top