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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking at my new-used fishing book (thanks docstash) and it seems on a cast (fly presentation) one is to adjust the sink tip with a pull & lift as to set-up straight and take water tension off the line, this begins the dive. Talking about lifting most or some of the tip out of the surface film and a draw back upstream... Then of course your decision of mending fly line to set up your swing. How many of you do just this? Hope you can understand its a bit hard to explain without a visual. I found this interesting since most everyone I see fishing just makes the cast and then swims the fly to the best of there experience. Thanks.
 

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I hope I'm understanding what your saying...Dec describes this mend in his book. The purpose is to get the tip straight and the fly ahead of the system, by eliminating the acceleration caused by the belly in the sink tip.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yep. I am trying to figure out if this can cause a lack of sink or add sink? The fly and tip start to sink and now they resurface. I am under the impression that line control with current speed will swing that fly in a way that fish will respond if your speed is right. (See what happens when I over-think this shit)
 

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Geriatric Skagit Swinger
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I do this a lot of the time - especially when I want depth. I angle the cast downstream, then mend it up so that my rod is pointing straight out. Often I'll make this mend while the line is still in the air, reach cast. But it can also be accomplished once it all lands. Then I let the head flow downstream with just slight tension to let the sink tip start its descent. As the line moves down, I swing my rod tip with it - almost pushing it. when the angle increases to the point where the fly is about to start swinging across in earnest is when I take a few steps to increase the time for my fly to sink. You've heard of "cast and step" right? Might as well make those steps work for you. When you stop, the line tightens up and your fly, barring any weird hydraulics will be at its deepest. The swing starts and the tension works on bringing the line up through the water column as it does - your fly is moving across and up as the river bottom comes up also...until you hit slower water near the bank.
 

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On a recent thread, I asked Spey Spaz the exact question. That is what I do since my casting is too poor to straighen a sink tip. As I understand it, the goal is to have everything straight from the fly to the rod tip. I pull back or do a line lift as soon as the line hits the water.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is a new idea for me and I have been fishing for a few now, Not that I am any good( I feel that every year gets better and that's a good thing) I have done this in the past but did not know this is standard practice. I just make my cast reading the water and mend my line according, followed by a few baby steps. I feel that swimming the fly is the most important thing and this sounds like it will always set you up on a slow butt presentation and I prefer a slight side view at all times until the dangle. I ask this because now I am second guessing myself and this could lead to more hook-ups! I don't know if this is just something for Skagit lines, I started with long lines and lessons that didn't ever mention this. I have had the opportunity to fish and learn from top guides and we just cast lift the running line and swing, lifting the head or sink-tip didn't happen. Thanks for the help- I wonder if I am missing something here.
 

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The thing that kills a lot of guys is that the line comes down on the water before the cast has completely unrolled, creating a belly from the getgo. This "pull back mend" that Dec describes in his book does just what these guys are telling you. It straightens everything up to set up the drift for maximum depth. Walking the dog, or feeding line into the drift before bringing the fly under tension is another method of gaining depth.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So a fella is in the clear if he presents the line right without a splashdown pile-up... I like to have some line to release after the cast for some tension release and a loop. All I straighten is my running line not my Skagit head or sink tip. I think it starts to swing and straighten itself but I am not out there to visually see it? I think that I will try walking my sink tip over the next few trips out to find if it makes a difference.
 

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So a fella is in the clear if he presents the line right without a splashdown pile-up... I like to have some line to release after the cast for some tension release and a loop. All I straighten is my running line not my Skagit head or sink tip. I think it starts to swing and straighten itself but I am not out there to visually see it? I think that I will try walking my sink tip over the next few trips out to find if it makes a difference.
Stewart Dee, here are three points in reply to the above qouted statement:
1) Straightening the line system out is only half of the purpose of the pull back mend...By pulling back 6-8' of line it can then be feed back into the drift by lowering the rod from the high rod position to a low postion, to attain depth prior to the swing.
2) Running line is typically the straightest thing of all in the cast, especially since the high initial rod positon, will or almost suspend the entire running line from the rod tip to the head.
3) If your depending on the current to straighten the tip out, don't count on it, in fact if you introduce more line, either by feeding or walking, and the tips got a down stream belly, you'll just make it worse.
 
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