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In July, I wrote this story about the collapse of Seattle's Cedar River sockeye salmon fishery. Maybe someone here would enjoy the read, even if the tale has no happy ending...

Peace.

 

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Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
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If I recall correctly, the sockeye were introduced into the lake back in the 30's. I'm personally more worried about the health of native cutthroat then the hatchery sockeye.
I don't think there are going to be big returns or sportfishing opportunities in the future regardless of how many fry are planted. Its been 16 years since the last season and unless they lower the escapement number needed to have a sport season, I don't see it happening..
I have nothing against hatchery fish, but I think the Cedar River hatchery is a complete waste of money.
SF
 

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Seattle knew Lake Washington sockeye all right and really appreciated that fishery when the population was abundant. That time was from the late 1960s through the 1980s. Those sockeye originated from stocking eggs of Baker Lake sockeye, located in the Skagit River basin north of Seattle. That stocking by the U.S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries (later to become the National Marine Fisheries Service in 1975) occurred from 1936 to 1940 along with stocking many other lakes in western Washington, hoping to create sockeye populations to enhance commercial fishing in Washington State.

Prior to 1968, Lake Washington was too polluted by municipal sewage. In that year, Forward Thrust was begun to clean up the lake along with other environmental efforts. That helped create the peak years of Lake Washington sockeye abundance, and the fishing was often good. Then along with more sockeye came more sockeye predators. There are a lot of causes for the reduced abundance of sockeye, but it looks like predation on juvenile fish in the lake is the most proximate cause. The sockeye may go extinct, but I think they won't. They just won't be abundant.
 
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