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Now hanging at the other, better new place
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just an FYI

I was at Coastal Ranch and Home in Mt Vernon today and they had 5 or 6 plastic SOT kayaks in the $400 range. The fishing model was a little more. It looked like it came with a couple rod holders. Not sure what else made it a fishing model. Anyway, if you're into those big fat wide SOTs, they didn't seem too bad.

Kind of a cool store for a big box.
 

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Dang I spent the last month over in that area and didn't know I should have gone in there. Would have liked to check that out.

A fishing kayak is on my wish list to get by the end of the summer, but I need to learn more about them before I go buy something that doesn't work for me
 

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Now hanging at the other, better new place
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dang I spent the last month over in that area and didn't know I should have gone in there. Would have liked to check that out.

A fishing kayak is on my wish list to get by the end of the summer, but I need to learn more about them before I go buy something that doesn't work for me
Dig around for info here when you have time. There is some good stuff. Then you'll see who knows their stuff and can hit them for more deets.
 

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Bigfoot is blurry
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I semi looked into SOTs last summer, but most of what I saw had pretty low weight capacities. I wasn't willing to spend a bundle and all the cheaper ones were rated for 300lbs or less.
Coastal is a cool store. Huge boot selection and decent gun sales sometimes.

Sent from my XT1080 using Tapatalk
 

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Smells like low tide.
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Just an FYI

I was at Coastal Ranch and Home in Mt Vernon today and they had 5 or 6 plastic SOT kayaks in the $400 range. The fishing model was a little more. It looked like it came with a couple rod holders. Not sure what else made it a fishing model. Anyway, if you're into those big fat wide SOTs, they didn't seem too bad.

Kind of a cool store for a big box.
Matt B, What brand were they? What was the length (in feet) and width (in inches) on the fishing model? What was the weight capacity? A lot of the cheaper ones you see aren't nearly as well made nor as seaworthy as the better brand names (such as Hobie, Ocean Kayak, Wilderness Systems, and others). For example, on the cheaper ones, the hatch seals often leak.

Nick, it might be better to see if you can find a used higher end one in good condition. Sometimes you can find a good deal on Craigslist if you know what you are looking for. You should know what kind of waters you want to fish from it. What are your needs?
A better one in good used condition might still cost more than a new cheaper one, but you might get more value for your $$.
I'm hoping to get back out along the Jetty in my 14' Tarpon again, but it almost seems like my doctors just want to keep me strung out and use me as a source of revenue for as long as they can get away with it.
 

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Now hanging at the other, better new place
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Matt B, What brand were they? What was the length (in feet) and width (in inches) on the fishing model? What was the weight capacity?
Don't recall the brand. Wasn't one I'd heard of. Didn't look at the specs either. Just an FYI if someone wanted to look more closely.
 

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Smells like low tide.
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Nucanoe is hard to beat, Nick. Good weight capacity, wide & stable and paddles well. I know I'm happy with mine.
I've been toying with the idea of getting a 12' Nucanoe Frontier like your's, and powering it up with an electric motor. With a couple of extra batteries along, it might have some range.
I saw a nice used 10' Frontier on Craigslist, and thought about checking it out, but I actually prefer the 12' length.
 

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Smells like low tide.
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The bigger, high end fishing kayaks don't seem to have any advantage over my smokercraft.
This is true for a lot of waters. Lakes, the salt, and any larger streams where there is a boat launch.
In my area, I tend to fish some estuarine backwaters and smaller tidal creeks where a deeper draft and heavier aluminum boat has a good chance of getting stranded when the tide goes out. Some of these don't have a boat launch, and I have to carry or cart my yak to the water. Some of the beaches where I can launch are a long ways from any public boat ramps.
However, it will often happen that while I'm faffing around loading up my yak in preparation for getting launched at a boat ramp, someone will show up with their already prepped trailered craft, back it in, get it launched, park their rig, and be out fishing by the time I finally get launched. But I never see any larger motorized craft in some of the spots where I paddle.
 

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Don't recall the brand. Wasn't one I'd heard of. Didn't look at the specs either. Just an FYI if someone wanted to look more closely.
I've seen the Future Beach 12' SOT for sale at a number of places (Dick's, West Marine, and Costco) for $400 on several occasions. It has a 420 lb weight capacity, features a 'tunnel' hull, and is extremely stable. I got one a few years ago for the OL, and it works quite well. She doesn't fish, but if I didn't have an Emotion Mojo Angler already fitted out for fishing, I wouldn't hesitate to set it up as my fishing boat.

The main thing you generally have to do to make a relatively low priced SOT suitable (if it has decent weight capacity) is to add a good aftermarket seat back, Scotty rod holder, and purchase a good paddle....and that generally holds true for high-end yaks as well.
 

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Smells like low tide.
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The weight of the SOT yak is a factor to consider. SOT yaks usually aren't as easy as a sit-inside yak (or a canoe) to portage or lug around on dry land. I ended up getting a cart to transport my 85+ lb 14' Tarpon 140 down the beach to the water. I can load it up with my gear once its on the cart, and make only two trips (second one involves taking the cart back to lock inside my rig, and grabbing whatever else I missed on the first trip...usually my camera, paddle, any electronics, or other valuables that I don't want to leave unattended while my back is turned).
I don't usually take my best, most expensive rods/reels out on the SOT with me, but use my "second string" stuff, which isn't all that bad. Just in case I capsize, even though I usually leash everything to the yak.
I lost a flyrod/reel this Spring that I hadn't leashed.
I have a Wheeleez kayak cart with the big low pressure urethane tires, so it rides on top of the soft sand even when loaded up with well over 100 lbs.
I'd been shopping for a shorter and lighter SOT (around 40 lbs) for quick launches to a couple of close-in spots that don't involve a lot of paddling. Something like a Malibu Mini-X, or even smaller.
 

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Smells like low tide.
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I've seen the Future Beach 12' SOT for sale at a number of places (Dick's, West Marine, and Costco) for $400 on several occasions. It has a 420 lb weight capacity, features a 'tunnel' hull, and is extremely stable. I got one a few years ago for the OL, and it works quite well. She doesn't fish, but if I didn't have an Emotion Mojo Angler already fitted out for fishing, I wouldn't hesitate to set it up as my fishing boat.

The main thing you generally have to do to make a relatively low priced SOT suitable (if it has decent weight capacity) is to add a good aftermarket seat back, Scotty rod holder, and purchase a good paddle....and that generally holds true for high-end yaks as well.
I just did a search on those, and the Future Beach 124 SOT is 10' 4" long and comes in 2 models. The more deluxe version is $400 at Dicks.

I paid $700 for my bare bones Tarpon 140 back in Sept 2009, and ended up adding on another couple hundred $$ worth of stuff to make it a "fishing yak," including a home made anchor trolley, a dash mounted compass (for when the fog rolls in thick), a cheap sonar/gps, Scotty rod holder bases, some flush-mount "rocket launcher" style rod holders, etc. I did some cutting, drilling, gluing, and adding fasteners. I even outfitted it with a downwind Pacific Action sail (more $$), and of course a foot-rest controlled rudder (scored it on sale at a good price).
 

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I just did a search on those, and the Future Beach 124 SOT is 10' 4" long and comes in 2 models. The more deluxe version is $400 at Dicks.

I paid $700 for my bare bones Tarpon 140 back in Sept 2009, and ended up adding on another couple hundred $$ worth of stuff to make it a "fishing yak," including a home made anchor trolley, a dash mounted compass (for when the fog rolls in thick), a cheap sonar/gps, Scotty rod holder bases, some flush-mount "rocket launcher" style rod holders, etc. I did some cutting, drilling, gluing, and adding fasteners. I even outfitted it with a downwind Pacific Action sail (more $$), and of course a foot-rest controlled rudder (scored it on sale at a good price).
Buying a kayak is just like buying your first flyrod...the first step towards perdition, mania, and expense.

Of course, as far as watercraft go, they suffer from none of the inherent defects associated with larger motorized vessels...miniscule initial cost, the 'motor' always starts, require no licensing, can travel into just about any fishy aquatic environment, store easily, launch about anywhere, and cannot plausibly transport unwanted freeloading fishing 'associates'.

No wonder the vast majority of powerboats spend their lives (once the first few voyages are over) collecting dust in driveways, garages, and storage lots....emerging sporadically on various holiday weekends, only to precipitate family crises when they inevitable demonstrate their propensity to breakdown in a singularly inconvenient and expensive manner.
 
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