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Hi chaps:
Haven't posted much since the xmas party still recovering from such a overwhelming collection of expert fishing boozers and the Old Man!!!!
However, its time for me to come out of winter hibernation and look forward to "spring fishing", a time when the weathers' warm and the beer is cold.
My son and I are going to the Conconelly lakes first week of May and this will be the first time since our conversion to fly fishing to try the lakes using bugs and flies.
I would appreciate a wealth of information as to what hatches there may be around the first week of May or what nymphs we should consider for that time.Of course any incidental information that will make our fishing week worth reporting to you is our aim.Please don't say ask the locals they bait fish.
All the best
Tony
tony:beer2
 

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Slainte
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I would think that chironomids would be in any water in that area. I plinked around the lake one night last spring waiting to meet up with friends to hit a higher lake in the area, nothing on dry flies. Granted I was fishing from a dock, a boat might have helped. Try traditional trolling methods, wet flies, leeches, buggers, etc. Sink tip, intermediate, and full sink are all possibilities.
If you strike out, head up the valley to Blue Lake.

Roper,Truth above all else
 

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I agree that chironomids would be in order. The first week of May you might run into a hatch of a quite large, pale pinkish-orange chironomid endemic to the area known as the pink lady. the pupa is about a #10-#8, and the trout like em real good. But bring all sorts of chironomid pupae, some olive pheasant tails in #14-#18 for callibaetis nymphs, some damsel nymphs, and some wooly buggers and/or leech patterns. Aren't there "goldfish" in Concunally? Maybe some zonkers. I've never fished Concunally, but the lakes in that neck of the woods do seem to have caddis, although you will likely be there a little early for that. You'll likewise be a little early for the callibaetis hatch, but I'd bring some dry flies (callibaetis parachutes, comparaduns, or Adams parachutes)and emergers just in case. Other lakes in the area worth trying are Aeneus, Ell, Blue, and of course Chopaka.
 
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I was in the neighborhood the first week or two of last May and stayed at Wannacut Lake. Twenty rainbows in the first 1/4 mile kick in my float tube-all on Red Carey Specials. The next morning midges hatched by the BILLIONS with the buzz of wings in the air sounding like a diesel generator was running nearby. Many other good lakes nearby as previously mentioned. Mid week over there in the spring is uncrowded and oh so beautiful with the blossoms out and green on all the hills. Surface activity is often sporadic that time of year and the wind can blow like stink for days so I would be sure to carry an intermediate line for sure. If you guys are relatively new to flyfishing I suggest you stay away from those flimsy little tippets and use about 3X for your subsurface flies. Some of those rainbows seem to take at full speed in the opposite direction that you are pulling the fly with predictable results on small tippets. Sounds like you'll have a great time, tight lines, Ive
 
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