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Silly question inspired by the Stilly Brown Trout thread: Why are sea run Bull Trout called "Bull Trout" and treated the same as a landlocked Bull in say, Montana. While Sea Run Rainbow are called Steelhead and treated differently than a landlocked Rainbow in Montana? I'm a social science guy not a genetic science guy, so just pondering. No implications in this post just openly curious...
 

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Just an Old Man
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What do I know---I'm just an old man

That's funny,I also have fished in Montana.Used the same flies and had the same results that I have here. :WINK It's funny That this comes up, I went there twice to fish and get away from it all and I never used anything different that I use here.

It's like going to Eastern Washington from the West side. You use the same flies but the fish are bigger and there are more of them. At least that's what it seems like to me. :THUMBSUP

Jim
 

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IMO, the reasons for differential treatment are mostly ecological (e.g., the population of the resource) and political (the popularity of the resource).

In general, all Salvelinus (char), Salmo (Atlantic salmon and Brown trout), and Oncorhynchus (salmon and trout) are genetically anadromous. In some, the genes that determine anadromy are expressed in all individuals (e.g., O. kisutch, O. tschawytscha), in others only some proportion of individuals express these genes (O. mykiss, O. clarki, S. confluentus).

The current view is that no speciation exists between the anadromous variants and their landlocked bretheren. For example, when two steelhead trout are mated, some small proportion of the progeny never migrate and live out their lives as non-migratory rainbow trout. At the same time, when two non-migratory rainbow trout are mated, some small proportion of their progeny become anadromous(1). Finally, when a non-migratory rainbow trout is mated with a steelhead, the genes that express anadromy sort according to classical mendelian genetics.

One way to view these variants is as "races" of the same species. They look and behave quite differently, but they can interbreed (and often do) and their progeny are fertile.

Cheers,

Michael
Footnote 1: Provided an outlet to the ocean exists.
 

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Just an Old Man
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What do I know---I'm just an old man

Hey quit using such big words. You lost me at the first line. I call them fish. Steelhead,Searun Cutts,Salmon,Etc. All them latin names throw me off as I can't talk um. I just use what I know and it's English. :HMMM

Jim
 

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Ya got me, Jim. I was having fun showing off my growing fisheries library.

In general, all Salvelinus (char), Salmo (Atlantic salmon and Brown trout), and Oncorhynchus (salmon and trout) are genetically anadromous. In some, the genes that determine anadromy are expressed in all individuals (e.g., O. kisutch, O. tschawytscha), in others only some proportion of individuals express these genes (O. mykiss, O. clarki, S. confluentus).
+ Salvelinus confluentus = Bull trout
+ Salmo salar = Atlantic salmon
+ Salmo trutta = Brown trout
+ Oncorhyncus mykiss = Steelhead / rainbow trout
+ Onchorhyncus kisutch = Coho salmon
+ Onchorhyncus tschawytscha = Chinook

Doncha just love the name Salvelinus confluentus? I love that name.

Cheers,

Michael
 

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Seems like we are leaving out Salvelinus Fontinalis, brook trout, or just "brookies." In the East, I have heard that they sometimes go down to the sea, although you don't read much about that out here.
They are chars, of course, just like lake trout, Arctic chars, Dolly Vardens,etc. To me, they are all just trout. Even kings and silvers are just big trout. No, suckers are not trout, and don't try to convince me otherwise. Carp, suckers and bass are all fun if there is nothing else to do. But they are not trout. Trust me here.
BOBLAWLESS :pROFESSOR
 

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Just a note as to why sea-run rainbow are called steelhead: Frequently thought to be a reference to the color of the back and head of a fresh-run steelhead, the term was actually borrowed from the usage of nineteenth and early twentieth century commercial fishermen. All of the steelhead's bones, including the skull, are substantially heavier and stronger than those of the other Pacific salmons. When emptying the nets, a single blow of the club sufficed to kill most of the catch, but the steelhead usually required two or three.
 

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Smells like low tide.
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Thanks. I always wondered about the origin of that name. A tough fish with attitude. Last one I had on gave me the fight of my life and then gave one last mighty leap and sent my barbless jig flying back at me....as if to say "kiss my oncorhynchus." Jimbo :LOVEIT
 
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