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We've had threads about anchors. Now I have a question about anchoring technique. Until last year, I only used a single anchor and just let my canoe swing from side to side, depending how strong the breeze might be.

This high falutin' technical chironomid fishing apparently requires the boat to stay still in one position with the use of double anchors. I'm building a pram specifically for lake fishing. I intend to install the customary anchor bracket on the bow.

What is the best way to achieve this stationary anchored position? I always let out enough anchor line scope so that the anchor doesn't drag. Then I just dropped the second anchor to minimize the swing. I bought a second anchor bracket (Scotty brand) that I expect to mount on a quarter knee by the transom. To really hold the pram stationary it seems like I would need to let out additional scope from the bow anchor line, drop the stern anchor, then take up some of that bow anchor line scope while letting out some stern anchor line scope, and finally snugging up both lines to hold the boat in a stationary position. Is that what you chironomid experts do? Seems like a lot of anchor and anchor line management every time you want to change the boat position or location.

How long an anchor line do you carry, and do you carry the same length for both anchors?
 

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FISHON206
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On the pram I built the knee braces have triangular holes in them. I tie the stern anchor to the left side. My rope lengths are 25' for most bobber fishing I don't want to be that deep. On the bow anchor, I have about 18" of heavy chain, this helps the anchor grab better.
 

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I do a lot chironomid fishing and I drop my anchors straight down (no scope).

You have to watch out for fish fouling in your anchor ropes so you want the smallest profile possible. Having an anchor line sticking out 10 feet from your boat is asking for trouble.

The deepest I've chronie fished is about 35 feet so 50 feet of rope should be enough (both anchors).

Get pyramid anchors if you can - they "stick" the bottom the best.
http://nfmetals.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Pyramid-Bare.jpg

You typically anchor with your back to the wind if you are solo but most anchor "sideways" if more than one in the boat. You'll need more anchoring "power" for the sideways setup.
 

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We've had threads about anchors. Now I have a question about anchoring technique. Until last year, I only used a single anchor and just let my canoe swing from side to side, depending how strong the breeze might be.

This high falutin' technical chironomid fishing apparently requires the boat to stay still in one position with the use of double anchors. I'm building a pram specifically for lake fishing. I intend to install the customary anchor bracket on the bow.

What is the best way to achieve this stationary anchored position? I always let out enough anchor line scope so that the anchor doesn't drag. Then I just dropped the second anchor to minimize the swing. I bought a second anchor bracket (Scotty brand) that I expect to mount on a quarter knee by the transom. To really hold the pram stationary it seems like I would need to let out additional scope from the bow anchor line, drop the stern anchor, then take up some of that bow anchor line scope while letting out some stern anchor line scope, and finally snugging up both lines to hold the boat in a stationary position. Is that what you chironomid experts do? Seems like a lot of anchor and anchor line management every time you want to change the boat position or location.

How long an anchor line do you carry, and do you carry the same length for both anchors?
I have two 50' lines.

I put out plenty of line on the bow anchor.
I drop the stern anchor straight down, which is marginally effective, and fight the fish off the stern.

With someone else in the boat to help,we do more effort to get angle on both ropes. Yes kind of a lot of rigmarole especially if you are having a hard time finding fish and dialing it in.

Jay
 

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Paging @Irafly

His skills at managing his anchors are impressive. When it's flat calm there is not that much to it, but when the wind kicks up and you're trying to anchor in a specific position it becomes a matter of skill and experience. Ira has both and I'm sure can explain some of the technique well.

Edit- It occurs to me that perhaps you won't be out fishing in conditions that make anchoring difficult, so maybe it doesnt matter
 

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Lue Taylor/dbfly
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What so scientific about dropping a anchor off the front and rear of your boat with enough rope to reach the bottom, if the wind is blowing over 20 mph I would find another place to fish or call it a day:D:eek:
 

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Paging @Irafly

His skills at managing his anchors are impressive. When it's flat calm there is not that much to it, but when the wind kicks up and you're trying to anchor in a specific position it becomes a matter of skill and experience. Ira has both and I'm sure can explain some of the technique well.

Edit- It occurs to me that perhaps you won't be out fishing in conditions that make anchoring difficult, so maybe it doesnt matter
+1 on Nick's comments. If you stick to the shallows and clear off the water when the W makes an appearance, there's nothing to discuss.
 

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I know some pretty serious stillwater anglers that taking anchoring to another level. They take into account wind level and direction to allow enough scope (angle of the dangle) on their rope to position in the right spot where they want to be and can anchor in some pretty impressive winds and be able to fish effectively. I stop short when physics and geometry come into play.

The important thing, especially for bobber fishing, is to have a bow and stern anchor. Once I find a spot to anchor (typically on a shallow shelf or drop off) I drop the bow anchor first and if a little breezy, I let a few extra feet of anchor line out, increasing the scope. I fish out the back of my pram and so I have the wind at my back, which makes easier casting and allows the water behind the boat to be a little less choppy, making bobber detection easier. I then slowly drop the stern anchor which hangs straight down.

There are times when it is too choppy to effectively bobber fish and so I measure out the full sinking type 7 line equal to the depth and fish vertically with pretty good success. I put the fly rod in a holder and wait for the rod tip to start bouncing, indicating a fish has taken the fly. This type of fishing is similar to when I still fished for kokanee as a kid with maggots and a single salmon egg. But generally if it gets too windy or choppy, I don't go to extreme measures to keep fishing, rather I head for shore to wait it out or head for home.
 

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When it's windy I'll pick the spot I would like stay at, drop the bow anchor and let out about 20' more line than normal and let the wind drift you back. Drop the stern anchor & then haul the bow anchor back in that extra 20' while still feeding the stern line out. Works most of the time and one reason I have 75' of line up front and 60' for the stern anchor. The thought of a 10-15 lb. galvanized lead pyramid anchor crashing into the bow of my wood pram causes me to lose sleep! Why I use rubber coated mushroom anchors.....15 lb. for the bow & 8 for the stern. If that doesn't hold me then I should be somewhere else.
 

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Uck Uck Uck, bitches
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I made a anchor of sorts...by pouring mixed concrete in a pringles can with a eye in the top and a small aluminum bar nutted to a 1/4-20 lug on the bottom...fits in my float tube just swell
 

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Indi Ira
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It has already been mentioned, but angle is key and depending on your anchors and the wind, you may need more angle than you have rope. I have rarely let wind stop me from anchoring where I want to anchor. I now have channel markers that I use to indicate where I want to fish/anchor and I use those to determine how far up wind I need to be to start the anchoring process. With two people in the boat you need to be broadside to the wind and that can make things more difficult, but I normally carry an extra anchor set up to throw off the side along with the bow and stern anchor. I also bring a bag that I can throw rocks into if all else fails. I've tied some damned heavy rocks onto my anchor line before so I could stay put. I few years ago I lost about a 50 pound anchor, yep it was a beast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I lack the commitment and interest to fish in that much wind Ira. I remind myself that I fish for fun, and if the wind makes anchoring that complicated, it makes fly casting even worse. At that point there is always something else that I'd rather do. I'll stick with two anchors, which is a 100% increase from what I'd ever use before last year.
 

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Indi Ira
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I lack the commitment and interest to fish in that much wind Ira. I remind myself that I fish for fun, and if the wind makes anchoring that complicated, it makes fly casting even worse. At that point there is always something else that I'd rather do. I'll stick with two anchors, which is a 100% increase from what I'd ever use before last year.
Fishing in that much wind can be fun, but I agree, sometimes it can be aggravating as well. If I can't stick after a couple of attempts with my best efforts, I move on.
 

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Jimmy z
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Fishing in that much wind can be fun, but I agree, sometimes it can be aggravating as well. If I can't stick after a couple of attempts with my best efforts, I move on.
I use one anchor with a forty foot rope. My anchor is twenty five pounds I try to keep things simple. Try to keep the wind at your back if. I start to get blown around I move to a different location. Its much easier. To pull up one anchor than 2 anchors. Also with 1 large anchor I don't have to worry about sliding out of. Where I anchor .
 

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Indi Ira
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I use one anchor with a forty foot rope. My anchor is twenty five pounds I try to keep things simple. Try to keep the wind at your back if. I start to get blown around I move to a different location. Its much easier. To pull up one anchor than 2 anchors. Also with 1 large anchor I don't have to worry about sliding out of. Where I anchor .
Too much moving around with just one anchor. This might be ok for one person, fishing one indicator rod, but I'm often either fishing with other people or I'm fishing two rods. I need the boat to be stable and not moving around.
 
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