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Smells like low tide.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I try not to think about the big picture when playing with these swags:
They are mass produced energy beings, struggling for freedom on the end of my line, and I know that I must be stealing their energy, as they weaken and I, myself, feel energized. With my participation in the game, I buy into the pimping and whoring of these unfortunate creatures, and I delight in their struggles on the end of my line. We'd all rather fish for wild fish. But in a diminished world, I guess these mass produced hatchery swags have become the daily drivers for many of us. They usually are easier to access, and they are very gullible, not really worthy of respect. They'll hit nearly anything you throw down in front of them. That is, soon after they are stocked.
After they make the transition from "rube who just fell off the turnip truck," to "resident with some local savvy," and maybe have been sore-mouthed and released at least once, however, fishing for them becomes a more interesting game.
Sometimes I think that some lakes should be closed to fishing for at least two weeks after stocking. Maybe even longer. After being raised on hatchery food pellets, how long does it take for a hatchery trout to learn how to eat real food forms in a lake? I have caught "recently stocked" trout as long as two or three weeks after stocking, and harvested some at the request of friends who wanted to eat a trout, that had completely empty stomachs. I always examine the stomach contents of any trout that I kill.
A hatchery trout that hasn't yet learned how to forage for natural food items will hit anything that moves.
 

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CCA, Hatchery Wild Coexist
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like the idea of planting fry instead of stockers, but do wonder if its just a waste of money ?
some lakes i fish get stocked with fry (cutts) but they dont seem to survive very well at all. one lake the best i could get was one 8" fish.
on the other hand some of the lakes i fish seem to be in a real funk with the hold overs. not sure if its the rain or what ? but the fish just are not in the mood.
 

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Smells like low tide.
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7,951 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I suspect that the recent rain and stormy weather might have affected the bug hatches, or disrupted the trouts' feeding patterns in some other way. These fresh plants may not even be keyed into any bug hatches yet. The water level in the lake I'd been fishing came up two feet with all the rain we had, and the recently planted trout were definitely off the bite, and maybe dispersed.
 

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I'm not sure it's just stockers that hit anything. There's a lake I fish that contains all wild fish. There are times when they hit almost anything.
I've also had my arse handed to me fishing for freshly planted stockers. I would of sweared the lake was void of fish, but I saw the tanker truck dump a bunch of fish the week before.
I agree with you about planters providing opportunities for us that can't regularly travel the state/country/globe in search of wild fish. I just watched a video about Kamchatka steelhead. One of the "bros" on the video said "he rather stay home and watch paint dry, than fish for hatchery fish". Ya, me too, if I could travel every year to Kamchatka to fish for wild fish.
My name is Paul and I would rather fish for hatchery stockers, than watch paint dry.
 

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Dumbfounded
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10,887 Posts
I've wandered around a hatchery or two and couldn't help but notice the hatchery trout feeding on bugs from the surface. I have a feeling that trout instinctively will eat aquatic insects and do not lay around all day waiting for pellets. Probably competition from the other trout is the reason they are aggressive feeders when first planted. They had to be aggressive feeders when growing up in the hatchery so when dumped in a fishery, they still have that attitude.

I'm not so sure it would do much good to temporarily close down a fishery after planting, I've fished recently planted fisheries and didn't get a damned bite so the hatchery trout are not always street rat crazy feeders once they are planted.
 

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This thread has got me to thinking again, never a good thing. What if a fellow were to design a new, or altered fly, and name it, POWER BAIT BUG.

I doubt that this idea has anything to do with anything, but it was a thought wave just the same. It promises to be a loooooong winter.
 

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Smells like low tide.
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7,951 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've wandered around a hatchery or two and couldn't help but notice the hatchery trout feeding on bugs from the surface. I have a feeling that trout instinctively will eat aquatic insects and do not lay around all day waiting for pellets. Probably competition from the other trout is the reason they are aggressive feeders when first planted. They had to be aggressive feeders when growing up in the hatchery so when dumped in a fishery, they still have that attitude.

I'm not so sure it would do much good to temporarily close down a fishery after planting, I've fished recently planted fisheries and didn't get a damned bite so the hatchery trout are not always street rat crazy feeders once they are planted.
Aha! I kind of suspected this.:D Once, returning to the launch, I fished a big school of hatchery cutts that had just been dumped in and hadn't yet dispersed. After about 5 minutes or so of having the trout fight over my fly every time it touched down, stripping in a 13"-15"+, releasing it, and repeating, the novelty wore off, and it just felt "unsportsmanlike" to continue. A couple of days later, I returned to the lake to find that the cutthroat had spread out.
 

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Dumbfounded
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As far as I can tell, growing up a hatchery trout is similar to growing up in a large family. When food is available, there's a mad dash to get what you can while you can before your siblings eat it all.

Once the planters finally figure out that they don't need to all hang around together as they did in the hatchery, competition for food is greatly reduced so they can become more picky as to what they try to eat.
 

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CCA, Hatchery Wild Coexist
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i was referring to trout that had been planted in the spring and are now in some funk, from too much rain or colder temps, or just worn out. i would think all this new fresh water coming in would get them on the bite. since now they have more environment to hunt food. ya there i go thinking. new plan is to try fly's in colors i dont normally use like pink, red, purple, blue etc.
 
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