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I've been to the Yakima a few times lately. Its my understanding that nymphs work (I had success with this) or fishing streamers deep in the pools work well. Obviously you need a sink tip fly line to do this. What type of drift should I aim for? My gut feeling is something that is pretty close to a dead drift with an occaisional twithcing?

Also, do you need to feel your streamer ticking on the bottom, or is it OK to drift higher in the water column?

I suppose it would be good to remember that the trout are just slower this time of the year.

Jeff
 

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I was up there this past Friday and the fish (only one 15-16" rainbow in 3 1/2 hours of fishing) I caught was in slower (right on the seam of the faster water), shallower (2-3') water. I used a conehead bugger with a little split and the streamer was just ticking the bottom. Didn't even worry about twitching. The fish took the fly very softly.

Greg


"In our family, there is no clear
line between religion and fly
fishing" Norman Maclean
 

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I was doing real well with an olive skulpin zuddler in December, but was skunked January 11, so who knows. They're tied with lead on the shank and I-Balz in #6 long so they go deep. I was fishing with a sink tip. The fly rides with the hook up, but I lost a few. They were hitting it hard when they wanted it. I cast across, down and across if shallow, swing it like a steelhead fly, let it hang straight down stream for a couple seconds, then strip in slow. I've caught fish in each part of the swing, even as soon as it hit the water, but it's usually as the fly starts to feel the tension of the swing, and during the hang. Best water was near the top of deep pools in the soft edges.
 

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I haven't fished the Yak lately but with streamers have had good luck with a floating line and long ( 9') stout leader with split shot. I picked up a great tip from a book on fishing Brownies--rather that putting the split shot 12-18" up from the streamer, put it directly above the knot--I used this method even with a large beadhead Wbugger (black mostly) to get it down low and fast. I had good results fishing it with a cross-current or slightly down-current cast and swing, snaking it among large boulders and seams, with a slow stripping action--man those big bows hit hard!

Fish on! :thumb
 

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I fish streamers for trout almost exculsively. I prefer to drag them through every inch of holding water I find. I have had my best luck with casting them into the current as it drops into a hole, and then after it sinks, bringing it back along the seam in short jerks. I get strikes that are solid and hard. There is no doubt that a fish wants the fly, and most hook themselves. Good luck. Rob.
 

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I second this notion and thought on streamers, as it is the only way I can hook a fish ;). I enjoy fishing with streamers more than any other fly, especially in quick moving waters.

~Patrick ><>
 
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