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If u know u know
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
Last night I took a trip over to Squalicum, and landed several nice bows just trolling around a bugger. I am still new to fly fishing, and have yet to learn many of the hatches and bugs that most trout around here feed on. All over the lake, trout were coming up and feeding directly under the surface, usually just small swirls or exposing their dorsal fin. I know this is a fairly common sight, but I did not see any bugs in the water due to it getting dark. What would the best type of fly to use be during this situation? Dry flies didn't seem to bring much attention, nor the nymph type patterns.
 

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this would be a good chance to try using a classic "wet fly" and strip it on a floating line and leader just below the surface.. anything made with peacock will be a good start. these are also called soft hackle flies.

as you learn more, you can get super in depth about matching the hatch, but for now I would worry less about the pattern and more about why the fly design works (im still working on that part). for some reason they are deadly on subsurface feeding trouts at times.
 

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Indi Ira
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You can troll those wetflies too at super low speeds. Even better if you are oaring. It can't be natural but I've had a bunch of fish takes like that. Its probably a callibaetis or trico (midge) emerging. I like something like these.

http://www.flyfishfood.com/2017/04/bucktooth-callibaetis-nymph.html
I never really saw callibaetis on that lake, and tricos are not midges, they are may flies but midges would definitely be in that water.

You likely caught a midge emergence. Did you see shucks on the water?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You can troll those wetflies too at super low speeds. Even better if you are oaring. It can't be natural but I've had a bunch of fish takes like that. Its probably a callibaetis or trico (midge) emerging. I like something like these.

http://www.flyfishfood.com/2017/04/bucktooth-callibaetis-nymph.html
I did troll several flies oaring, that seemed to work best. Tonight I am going out again and I will likely try a few new ones out.

I never really saw callibaetis on that lake, and tricos are not midges, they are may flies but midges would definitely be in that water.

You likely caught a midge emergence. Did you see shucks on the water?
I'm not entirely positive what shucks are, but I had a hard time seeing anything on the water last night. I am about to head out now, so I will take a look around before I start fishing. It could have been some smaller midges, which would have been difficult to spot after sunset.

Puget bug. Don't dope the fly, but grease the tippet about 6" above the fly and keep it just under the surface.

EDIT: @ScottP did a SBS: www.washingtonflyfishing.com/forum/threads/puget-bug-sbs.112437/
I don't have a vice or tying materials, but I do have a couple older flies that look pretty close to that. Does color matter that much? And I'm assuming floating line to a longer leader? Thanks for the tip

this would be a good chance to try using a classic "wet fly" and strip it on a floating line and leader just below the surface.. anything made with peacock will be a good start. these are also called soft hackle flies.

as you learn more, you can get super in depth about matching the hatch, but for now I would worry less about the pattern and more about why the fly design works (im still working on that part). for some reason they are deadly on subsurface feeding trouts at times.
I tried stripping several wet flies, but seemed to have less luck with that over trolling. I did see a decent amount of action around the Lilly pads and didn't get a chance to fish them, maybe that will give me some better success with that. Would it be best to strip weightless wet flies or beaded ones? I have been using beaded flies for wet fly fishing, but I think some weightless presentations would help keep the fly closer to the surface of the water.
 

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I did troll several flies oaring, that seemed to work best. Tonight I am going out again and I will likely try a few new ones out.

I'm not entirely positive what shucks are, but I had a hard time seeing anything on the water last night. I am about to head out now, so I will take a look around before I start fishing. It could have been some smaller midges, which would have been difficult to spot after sunset.

I don't have a vice or tying materials, but I do have a couple older flies that look pretty close to that. Does color matter that much? And I'm assuming floating line to a longer leader? Thanks for the tip

I tried stripping several wet flies, but seemed to have less luck with that over trolling. I did see a decent amount of action around the Lilly pads and didn't get a chance to fish them, maybe that will give me some better success with that. Would it be best to strip weightless wet flies or beaded ones? I have been using beaded flies for wet fly fishing, but I think some weightless presentations would help keep the fly closer to the surface of the water.
try wieghtless. vary the retreive. try short random pulse, try long slow strips, try medium strips in speed and length, long fast strips with long pauses, etc. varying the retrieve can really change how the fish react even on a day to day basis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
try weightless. vary the retrieve. try short random pulse, try long slow strips, try medium strips in speed and length, long fast strips with long pauses, etc. varying the retrieve can really change how the fish react even on a day to day basis.
Slower stripping and trolling ended up being a lot more productive. I don't think I had a single reaction strike, almost every fish was following a few minutes of trolling or stripping almost all the way to the boat. But the action was very consistent last night, and almost all 10-14 inch bows. It was DEAD calm when I launched, and almost white capping when I left... that is Squalicum lake for you.
 

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Sounds to me like they were taking midge emergers couple inches under the the surface. Try a small size 14 or 16, maybe even 18, midge (black with white rib and very small partridge collar) soft hackle stripped very slowly on your floating line with a long leader, you don't want it to float but just under the surface.... and hold on !
 
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