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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Taking the step Into the tying world and was wondering if anybody has any suggestions for a good vise to get for starting out! I plan on tying a lot of tarpon flys so I'd like a vise that can hold those hooks nice and steady!!
 

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Hi Nick,

I've had very good results tying all types of flies with a Renzetti Traveler. I've had mine since the 80's, and it's allowed me to tie tiny trout flies, salmon and steelhead flies, all the way up to large saltwater patterns for stripers. Whatever you do, make sure to get a rotary vise as they come in very handy for many tying applications. Price is right too.

HW
 

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Nick,

Any idea how much you want to spend on a vise? Are you going to focus on tarpon flies or tie smaller stuff like #16 trout flies, too.
If you can get to a flyshop and explain to them what you're looking for, they should let you test drive a few different vises so you can see what features they have and whether they'll work for you. Vises are a very personal thing and what works for one tyer may not work for another.

I've been using a Renzetti Traveler for 20 years now and love it; provides everything I need from a vise. Having said that, I don't tie a lot of larger saltwater flies and although it works fine, there are times when I break out my old Regal - doesn't have a rotary function (which is very nice to have, but not a necessity) but it has jaws that hold the hook (up to 5/0 for me) like nothing else I've seen.


Regards,
Scott
 

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I got the Atlas vice from Wolff Industries. I looked at the renzetti traveler, and it's super nice, but the price difference was significant to me. The hook access may be a bit better on the renzetti when inverted, though, as may be the ease of rotary. The atlas is pretty heavy, and doesn't like to be on its side without the drag set pretty tight. All that said, I love the atlas.

I would suggest starting with a cheap vise until you know you want to do it long term, but if you're tying bigger flies you may not like it with a cheap vise. They're not great above a 6 or 8. You probably just want to jump in with both feet.
 

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When I started out I got the Dyna King Kingfisher. It's a fantastic vise and doesn't cost a fortune. It can hold hooks from 8/0 to 22 no problem. It's worth getting a good vise if you are serious about tying. True rotary is nice but by no means necessary. I tie everything from small trout, big saltwater, shank, tube, and classic salmon flies in my vise without any problems.
 

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The best thing to do is buy the best vice you can afford and avoid the ones that sell for less than $80.00. You don't need a rotary, just get a good, well-made, stationary vise, and as a bonus, they are quite a bit less pricewise than good rotary vises. Cheap vises are false economy because they don't hold hooks nearly as well as well-made, slightly more expensive ones and they don't hold up. The best lower cost vise I'm aware of is the Griffin 2A, or its slightly bigger brother the 3A. Both are less the $100.00 new.

You can also look around for a quality used vise. Vises like the Thompson Model A, which was used by a huge number of commercial/professional tyers before vises like the Renzetties and Dyna Kings came on the market. They can be found for around $40.00 or less.

If you are convinced you need a rotary, there are several very good ones for between $125.00 and $150.00.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I really appreciate all the feed back guys! I did look into the traveler, but before I go that deep into I want to make sure I really enjoy the tying(which I know I will) haha, I just ordered this kit with made in the USA tools and vise and materials, seems like a really solid way to start tying, let me know what you guys think!
http://www.caddisflyshop.com/hareline-premium-fly-tying-kit.html
 

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I started with a kit like that for 40 years ago. And today I still think it was one of the Best Buy's ever. I got all my tools and my Vice to start with. I found myself buying more as the years went by and got better stuff.
 

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The odd thing about fly tying is I don't know of anyone who tried fly tying and gave it up. Instead, the novice normally ended up buying a better vise, better hooks and tons of assorted tools and tying materials.

Nick, considering you are starting with a Harline product, you are on the right track.

You will eventually end up buying a true rotary vise and there are dozens to choose from.

I like my DynaKing Barracuda Jr and it is my primary home vise. I use my Traveler with my portable tying kit. I also own five other vises... some are true rotary, some are stationary. For awhile, I guess I was into collecting fly tying vises... I don't know why.

Good luck and be prepared to start spending money on additional tools that you may or may not need and a lot of additional tying materials. ... it goes with the territory.
 

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I like my DynaKing Barracuda Jr and it is my primary home vise. I use my Traveler with my portable tying kit. I also own five other vises... some are true rotary, some are stationary. For awhile, I guess I was into collecting fly tying vises... I don't know why.
Whores and Vice....go hand in hand. ;)

I started with a $30-40 kit and a couple hundred bucks in materials, after my dad passed...and never looked back.
Gradually, after wearing that one out, I upgraded to the mid-priced HMH (rotary...used only to check the other side of things).
Best investment for a hobby...I've ever made.
Enjoy the ride!! :D
 
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