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Remember when you could remember everything?
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I've seen those and they seem attractive until you stop to remember that you're still gonna need waders, fins and related fishing and other gear. All that stuff adds up, so depending on the weight of the 'toon, you could be looking at a pretty heavy package.

As a point of reference, I regularly pack my relatively small 6-1/2 pound TU/Classic Accessories Gunnison float tube into Cascades lakes using a 6 pound Kelty external frame backpack. By the time I add waders, fins, raincoat, rod, reel, spools, flies, net, lanyard with tools, lunch, water, spare clothes and the Ten Essentials, I'm lucky to keep the entire pack under 30 pounds.

I don't know about you, but I'd much rather be carrying 20 pounds instead of 30, so bringing a bigger boat only makes my load heavier, not lighter.

K
 

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North Bend, WA
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Backpack, Bill. Backpack. And their talking float tubes, not toons. Apples - oranges. If you want to talk a raft, you talk a 6lb pack raft that takes up no more than 1-2 man tent in your pack, not 20-30lb kickboat that maybe you can fit into an 80ltr pack if you use the entire pack.
 

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I've packed my fishcat float tube, lightweight waders and fins in a pack. It ends up being about 20#. Add food, pump and gear and it is a heart pumping hike for the guy who loves cheeseburgers. I need to do more of that stuff.
 

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My Togiak, waders, fins, rod and fly stuff weighs in @ 14 lbs. My pack that I use with my tube loaded for 3 days weighs in at 21 lbs. That puts me in at 35 deliberate pounds for wet 3 season packing. My pack is 1.1 oz ripstop nylon wrapped inside my deflated tube with better D rings and shoulder straps.
Tell me what you come up with. Come on you watermaster guys. lets here it. I don't think you can bring a beer and be under 35 lbs. I shudder to think what a 'toon weghs in at.
Tom C.
 

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I fish a Curtis raft in the backcountry. Weighs in at 2 pounds including the paddles.

They are not making them any more, but there are two other start-ups out there making very similar rafts.
 

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Remember when you could remember everything?
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I spent the day yesterday with an old friend and a new one fishing a small lake on the tree farm. My friend and I both had our trusty SFCs and were easily able to navigate our way through the maze of fallen trees and hummocks to probe the little bays and coves where fish hid from aerial predators.

But our new friend had an Alpacka instead of a tube. While the boat is quite impressive in its build quality and light weight, it suffers from the same problems that caused me to sell my Curtis raft: you can't effectively fish and propel yourself at the same time.

The swirling and gusting winds yesterday required our new friend to tie his Alpacka to a limb or anchor while he fished, or be blown across the water in unintended directions. Even tied off or anchored, the Alpacka still pivoted on the end of its tether like a balloon on a string.

Yes, I understand that their light weight makes them especially suitable for fishing high mountain lakes where the weight of a tube, waders and fins would be prohibitive. But for me, the cost-benefit equation of those types of craft tilts quickly towards the negative when trying to use them as effective fishing boats.

K
 

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i have been toying with the idea of getting a toon that rolls up into a backpack.

any insight would be helpful. :hmmm:
some of the new float tubes these days are superlight, as are some cheap and surprising effective snorkeling fins that work great for kickin' tubes..and since the majority of fish in higher altitude, pack in small lakes tend to congregate around shoreline weedbeds or structure, not sure why you'd need anything with oars..whole lot easier to pack in the lightest tube and fin combo possible and just kick and fish..
 

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The thread title says "backpack." That elimiates any pontoon boat and pretty much any and all float tubes. Backpack means a pack already filled with a sleeping bag, ground pad or thermarest, tent or tarp shelter, stove and grub. Only after all that weight and bulk does fishing gear enter the equation. While not the most practical for fishing applications, at least the guys with Curtis rafts and Alpackas will be on the water, while the float tube crowd is still trying to figure out how to stuff the float tube, waders, and fins into their pack. Ain't gonna happen unless you're totin' a 7,000 cubic inch capacity expedition pack, made for 70 pound loads.

Sg
 

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In my younger days I packed in overnight gear, food, stove, 10 essentials, fly rod and required foofaraw along with a brand new state of the art U-Boat (inflated, with inner tubes for bladders), Browning waders (like Red Ball lights), booties, and fins, in/on my old MSR frame pack - like a JanSport with an Ome Daiber cord suspension - to mountain lakes. The whole outfit probably weighed about 35-40lbs and it wasn't too tough; about what I'd carry on overnight alpine climbs. But for longer trips, I actually like an ultralight spinning rig with a casting float and flies.
 

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My Togiak, waders, fins, rod and fly stuff weighs in @ 14 lbs. My pack that I use with my tube loaded for 3 days weighs in at 21 lbs. That puts me in at 35 deliberate pounds for wet 3 season packing. My pack is 1.1 oz ripstop nylon wrapped inside my deflated tube with better D rings and shoulder straps.
Tell me what you come up with. Come on you watermaster guys. lets here it. I don't think you can bring a beer and be under 35 lbs. I shudder to think what a 'toon weghs in at. Tom C.
:D I'm going to be giving it a try for day hikes. I am getting fairly fit again but I'll likely leave the beer for the return to the car.
 

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Remember when you could remember everything?
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The thread title says "backpack." . . .While not the most practical for fishing applications, at least the guys with Curtis rafts and Alpackas will be on the water, while the float tube crowd is still trying to figure out how to stuff the float tube, waders, and fins into their pack. Ain't gonna happen unless you're totin' a 7,000 cubic inch capacity expedition pack, made for 70 pound loads.
That's what I used to think. But technology marches on as a friend reminded me the other day. He's planning an overnight trip to a certain mountain lake with his float tube this summer and calmly told me that his pack would weigh 30 pounds or less. Having graduated form the same old school as you, I asked him to drop by one afternoon so that we could weigh his stuff and I could see how he packed it. Here's what he brought and what it weighed on my Harbor Freight digital scale:

Osprey Atmos 58 liter internal frame pack - 2.5 pounds

Hennessey Backpacker Hammock - ~2 pounds

North Face 32º down bag - ~1.5 pounds including compression stuff sack

TU Gunnison float tube - 6.5 pounds

Breathable stocking foot waders - ~ 4 pounds

Fins - 1 pound

Rod, reel, spool, net, misc gear - ~ 2 pounds

Therm a rest - ~1 pound

Jet Boil + utensils - 1.5 pounds

This does not include a MSR pump, water bottles, clothing or freeze-dried food, but at 20.5 pounds total for the above, you see where this is going and it's not anywhere close to 70 pounds - or even the 40 pounds I was figuring on.

K
 
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