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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can some one school me on what exactly this mutant aquatic creature is...or was?

I went to my local shop and they kept bringing this type of fish up, and I used the ol "nod and grin" tactic to avoid looking like half the idiot I am!

Thanks for any help/clarification


Andrew
 

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from another web site:

Triploid trout, steelhead, and salmon, are genetically altered fish. Because they are sterile they do not reproduce but rather, the energy which would have been focused in these fish toward reproduction, goes directly into body growth. Over time these fish become huge. Presently the record trout in the State of Washington is a triploid coming in at 23 pounds.:)
 

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It's a rainbow (although I hear there are now some places in eastern WA that have triploid brookies - sounds interesting) that has been bred with an extra set of genes. This makes them sterile so they can focus all their energy on feeding and growth rather than reproduction. That allows them to grow much faster than your standard rainbow.
 

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The above is a little mis-leading. Native steelhead and salmon are not "genetically altered" fish. Triploads are *exclusively* genetically altered fish. They have a third chromosome or some test-tube mumbo jumbo (pun intended).
 

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Triploid/Rainbow Record

The state recognized as a new rainbow record, a triploid caught near the net pens of Rufus Woods, weighing 25.45 lbs. in 1998. Since then I understand this record has been surpassed, also in Rufus Woods. I don't see mention of it in the current WDFW regulations, or any other state records. I do know of a number of "trips" being caught in this area of 15-20 plus lbs., but personally feel they are "bogus records", pigging out under the net pens should not qualify as a legitimate record for a rainbow. If they want to classify it as a feedlot record maybe it's justified. That's worse than the McDonalds lawsuits.
 

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Triploid trout are created by thermally shocking fertile eggs. This results in a fish with three sets of chromosomes rather than the normal two, hence triploid. Since such fish are sterile, and don't undergo the physical changes associated with sexual maturation, they grow faster, to larger sizes and maintain prime physical condition over a longer period of time.

Usually, after the eggs are hatched, the males are culled to prevent the possibility of interaction with fertile populations when they are stocked. Triploids, then, are always female and can usually be recognized by their bright silvery coloration; they resemble (on a small scale) fresh-run steelhead hens.
 

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The idiot technique

Im glad to see im not the only idiot that uses that technique. I honestly dont think I have ever told a shop "no, I dont know what that is".....thats just too funny.:rofl

~Patrick ><>
 

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I recently helped with a Pass Lake fish census, weighing and measuring Triploids alongside what the biologist called "wild" rainbows. I can provide some identification help from what I observed. Like Preston said the first thing you notice is the bright silvery coloration of the fish. They are big shouldered, tapering towards the tail. But the tail of these fish is rounded and irregular, chewed up if you will. The "wild" rainbows have nice forked tails coming to a nice point. Hope this helps.
 

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I used to know it all---but now I forgot it all.

Of all of these fish that they plant triploids included. I notice that all of there tails are rounded off from living in cement ponds. Do their tails ever grow back as they get bigger/grow.
:dunno

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
First off...thank you all for the information! So I guess the question is now are the fish brewed just for harvesting or scientific "look what I made!". With the very little logic that I do have...I would say it is a complete waste for a few reasons:

-If you cannot truly distinguish them from native trout without a microscope...the average person will not keep them in fear that it may be a reproductive trout.

-Lakes such as Squalicome have been planted, where at least 70% or more of fisherman C&R...which means that these glutons are possibly depriving the reproducing trout of food. Law of Nature...bigger will always survive...at least in most cases.

-Is this a good use of fishery's dollars? Or who ever is doing this...which is probably funded by our licensing fees.

Therefore, I would conclude that these fish are only good if they remain in "Big Jims Fish pond - bring the whole family and a can of corn for an hour of fun".


Am I trying to think to much...what are do others think...just curious?
 

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Triploid/Rainbow Record/Net Pens

I forgot to mention for those that may be unaware, that the net pens on Rufus Woods are commercial operations. The fish are triploids and are sold to firms such as Safeway, etc., may be called "Rainbow", "Steelhead", etc. The large triploids that are being caught near the pens are usually the result of escapees or releases that hang around the pens and pig out on the feed that filters through the nets. Most that I have seen are short heavy fish that have a softball size ball of fat in the belly. Not a fish that should be recognized as a Rainbow state record in my opinion. At the very least it should be listed with an asterisk to differentiate between fish caught under normal conditions in their natural terrain.
 

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Hi ya,
My two cents for a moment.... I've been reading about the use of triploids as hatchery fish. I tend to agree with it. If the fisheries were to use these fish as hatchery plants there would be no worries about "zombies" interbreeding with native stock. I personally see it in boys' eyes everytime they can catch one of these brutes compared to the little 8" fish they might catch. I'm not sure about this, but I understand that Alaska uses triploids so there is no interference with native steelheads.

Scott
 

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The idiot technique

pwoens said:
Im glad to see im not the only idiot that uses that technique. I honestly dont think I have ever told a shop "no, I dont know what that is".....thats just too funny.:rofl

~Patrick ><>
Glad you clarified that, I thought you were talking about squeezing eggs out of your females. ptyd
 

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Let's don't be so hasty as to disregreed what science can do. Remember that most of our lakes have no ingress or egress, but are simply a catch basins or seep lakes.

These lakes cannot sustain a population of fish because Rainbows MUST have moving water in order to spawn. So when they are planted in our lakes they grow to sexual maturity in a few quick years and then die because they cannot stand the stress of being unable to spawn. Now the lakes must be "restarted" with new fingerlings.

In my view, all stockers should be triploids since now they will continue to grow becauce spawning will no longer be an issue. Wouldn't you just love to see your little bobber starting to bob on out of here and you set the hook and A NINE pounder jumps clear of the water?

Don't tell me that triploids ain't natural because practically ALL the trout in Washington are not natural and are made by scientists in concrete tanks.
After a short while in a lake, they become exactly like a wild trout and I love them. I am opposed to hatcheries for anadromous fish because of the danger they pose to wild fish.

But for the Yakima and our WA. lakes, hatcheries are all we've got and I support them.

Bob, the Please correct me if I am wrong. :ray1:
 

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Supporting wild steelhead, gravel to gravel.
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I wonder what would happen if the fish and game put triploids in as fry plants. I think that would make them more "wild" and i would enjoy catching a fish that was in better shape than a fish with beat up fins and tail.

Peace,
Andy
 

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My two cents for a moment.... I've been reading about the use of triploids as hatchery fish. I tend to agree with it. If the fisheries were to use these fish as hatchery plants there would be no worries about "zombies" interbreeding with native stock. I personally see it in boys' eyes everytime they can catch one of these brutes compared to the little 8" fish they might catch. I'm not sure about this, but I understand that Alaska uses triploids so there is no interference with native steelheads.
Scott,

I don't know if triploid sea run rainbows would work. If they have know desire to
reproduce would they come back. Why would they if they don't want to
reproduce. They might as well stay in the ocean and eat.
 
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