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Trevor Hutton
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a problem (one of many). Ok, first of all I can cast quite well, prevent drag, all that good stuff. I Also know that trout are supposed to be in areas where they can get food with minimal use of energy (current seams, pools, behind rocks, eddies, foam lines, etc.)I usually know what to tie on ( not always, I kinda stink at this). So how come when I cast to where a fish would be, with the "right" fly & good presentation, there is nothing taking my fly? I do alright If I can see riseforms or see where the fish are, and lakes are ok too, but otherwise I don't have much happening. I am still learning (only been doing this about a year and a few months.) Also on rivers like the yakima in the canyon, Which I am but minutes away from, with no above surface structure to spot, or rises, where does one even begin to cast? I will hopefully get a lot more experience this summer once school is out (one week!)with my friend's dad who has been doin' this his whole life, but thought I would ask ya'll anyway.

P.S. I fished the s.f. of the snoq. on saturday near the riverbend community( I have some friends there) but this same thing happened to me---please help I am desperate :DUNNO Thanks for any/everything - Trevor
 

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By no stretch of the imagination am I an expert but if the trout aren't rising than they are probably feeding off of nymphs / emergers subsurface. It's safer for the fish to feed this way and not become a meal for osprey, hawks, eagles, etc.

Some people will tell you that 60-75% or more of a trouts diet is taken subsurface. Learn to fish nymphs (sometimes as a dropper off of a dry) you'll catch more fish, especially when there aren't any visible surface rises.

Good luck :THUMBSUP


Greg
 

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When you say "right" fly, is there a hatch occurring? If you have the right size, presentation, and color, maybe you need a longer leader and finer tippet? Maybe an emerger or a lower riding fly that's flush on the surface would bring them up. If there's a hatch and no rise forms go sub-surface. If there is no hatch and no clues on what's going on, go with an attractor pattern or terrestrial. All these are generalizations of course, it's hard to tell what the problem is with out being there with you, but your dads friend will be better suited to give you more hands on advice. Sorry I couln't be more help, good luck.

Joe
 

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I do more lakes than rivers because the best fising say the Yakima is in a boat and fishing under brush etc. Fishing lakes only require a float tube,etc. I fished the Cowlitz in my friends boat and caught 16" cutthrout under river trees and brush with a dry #8 Terranasty, it was awesome Giant Sept.Caddis action at its best!
What I'm saying is the best river fishing is in a boat, unless your in Montana or something where there is awesome wading access. A lake is convenient for BIG fish. Good luck!
 

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Last weekend, the temperature of the S. F. Snoqualmie was only 42 degrees, which is really cold for fly fishing. I suspect that there trout are just not very active right now. Usually that river fishes much better once the snow melt is complete, but that probably won't be until August this year.

Joe
 

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Trevor,

First of all, you are not doing anything wrong. In fact, you are doing everything right. In that I mean, you are asking questions and attempting to figure out the complex "science" of fly fishing. You know in the short time that you have been fly fishing where trout lie and how to get your fly to that spot. It could be very possible that the fish just aren't there. There are so many variables to this sport, but two that I have found to tell me more is water temperature and bottom insect activity. If the fish aren't rising, then they are probably feeding on the bottom. Here is a good way to find out what they may be feeding on. Get some nylon window screen (24"x24")and two wood dowels about 30" long. Staple the dowels to two sides of the screen, making sure that the screen is at the end of the dowels. Find an area in the stream that you can wade into. Standing upstream from the screen placed in the current, on the bottom, kick your feet on the bottom, turning over rocks, etc. All of the insects resting on the bottom will be dislodged and flow downstream into your screen. Take the screen out and lay it on the bank. In a moment of observing, you will see what the fish are feeding on. Each stream is different. If you see a lot of mayfly nymphs, and very few caddis, then you would assume that a caddis pattern would not be your first choice.
Ask a lot of questions and observe your surroundings. I have been fly fishing for almost 40 years and I learn something everytime I go out. That alone is what makes it fun.
I suggest you read "Streamside Reflections" by Steven J. Myers, Thunder Bay Press Series. It is an excellent book although a bit pricey. When I go out fishing I try to remember a quote from his book:
"Few moments in life are as full of hope and expectations as the instant we first gaze upon a stream we will spend the day fishing. The first cast carries our fly, and our hope, into the world of the trout. The next move belongs to the fish."

If you can remember that quote it can make a non productive day easier to take. Observe, ask questions and re-evaluate and then try again. And finally, if you have been trying this for a year and a half with little results, you my friend have got it in your blood....fly fishing. Congratulations!!!!! :WINK
Good Luck,
Marc
 

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You may also be relieved to hear that sometimes, the fish just ain't there. My girlfriend will often come out with me and float the river in her wet suit to tell me where the fish are. She'll do it a little quietly and any from the best floats as to not disturb the fish :) We've been out a few times where the rivers were a little high or a little cold or a little murky, and there *weren't any* fish to be seen. At times like these they may be in larger slower pools saving energy or perhaps near the bank where the currents aren't so swift.

With that said, sometimes they just get a little lip locked, and there isn't much you can do about it. Just keep working on technique and eventually they'll come around.

-- Cheers
-- James

PS You can't believe the kind of fish we miss all of the time! With Wendi floating the river, she's told me of 20" fish that I would have never known they existed! Being told there aren't fish has it's curse too. When I'm fishing bad, I get told *that* too ;)
 

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Trevor,
It is a classic case of wanting to catch 'em on dry flies when the fish are probably under the surface taking nymphs. It happens to me all the time. I put on a small dry fly and catch nothing all day. The fact that trout are not always persuaded to take surface flies means that you must diversify your techniques to increase your productivity level. For nymphing, try the "hinged technique". This is a staple for easily detectable strikes. Also, it doesn't hurt to cast a heavily weighted cone headed streamer (olive) in the deeper pools if dry fly activity is nil. Following one of the three for various conditions of the Snoqualmie always produces a few trout. Another thing I like to do when the fishing is slow is to put the flyrod away and try to tune in on the insect situation. Look for Swifts and Swallows diving down on the river. Look for Sandpipers on the rocks or even sometimes robins comb the shallows. This is a good clue to insect activity and in turn gives you an idea of where to fish. Another is to simply cover more water. Walk up and down the banks and sooner or later you will see a situation that will be hard to pass up. (i.e. a deep swirling pool that probably has 14 inchers on the bottom)
This is not all sound advice but simply another perspective. If all else fails, you still catch nothing, time to start thinking of excuses on why you didn't catch fish that particular day. (For me on the Yakima yesterday it is a couple. One was the river being very fast moving and the other is because my fly was pretty big which is why I didn't get the hookup on that 18"er, not because I was too busy trying to row away from shore and fish at the same time)

Okay that is my answer.





Next time, try the Purple King. They like purple! :pROFESSOR
 

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Hello Trevor,
Are you primarily a bank angler ? Do you get a little jealous watching drift anglers go by, covering more water in a day than you can in all of your trips out combined ? Do you wish you could fish from a boat but don't have the big bucks it takes to do this? If this is your perdicament, I may have an offer for you. The thing is that I own my own drift boat, but I have a hard time of convincing my buddies that we can do the Yakima on a day trip. If you are interested joining me for a day, I'd be more than happy to accomadate you. I live in the Lynnwood area over here in Western Wa.
Feel free to contact me at [email protected] and we can discuss this further

Deanfisher
 

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Trevor Hutton
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
hey, thanks ya'll! This sets my mind at ease and will give me some more to chew on for a while. I think what will help me most at this point is the fishing itself, because I can read as much as I want but I can't get into fish with my nose in a book. :BIGSMILE Luckily I have school for only 4 more days and the summer is mine.
 
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