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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As much as I like hiking around on our west side rivers during the winter, I can't help but think back to last spring and fall when I actually brought some nice fish to hand while bobbing around in lakes in 70 degree weather. I jumped on the flourocarbon bandwagon last season but have the same complaints as many, chiefly that my knots don't hold but also I really can't say I caught more fish. Also, I caught my first summer steelhead during the bone-low water of last October using 8lb maxima chameleon for tippet.

Sooo anyway, what are you peoples favorite regular old mono tippet materials for trout? I'm curious about Froghair, Umpqua, Rio, Orvis, etc. I'm thinking of getting rid of the flouro and trying some quality mono that will stretch and tie well. I've been reading Rickard's "Flyfishing Stillwaters for Trophy Trout" and getting a bit ancy for the March 1st opener . ..

Rod:beer2
 
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I have had pretty much the same reaction to fluoro as you and have gone back to regular mono as well. I tried the Umpqua for awhile but it always seemed to kink right above the fly which didn't work too well for dry fly fishing. I also used Orvis Super Strong which worked ok, particularly for nymphing. Now I am using Varivas Super Tippet and I like the way it straightens and resist kinking. I used it last fall when my buddy came to fish for a week and he used the new Rio Fluoroflex Plus. I had more hookups and caught more fish even though we were using almost identical equipment otherwise. The only thing that proves to me is that there are still some skill sets needed for flyfishing that can't be compensated for by just buying more expensive equipment.
I may give fluoro one more try as I have found a source of Umpqua Deceiver tippet material in 100 meter spools. It sells for $18.95 and at that price is about 1/2 the price of the same material sold on 25 meter spools. The larger spools will easily last me a couple of seasons and the lower price makes it a lot more appealing. The only thing I don't know about it-is it any good? Maybe someone has the answer to that?? Ive
 

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Seagar GrandMax Flouro Tippet and/or Maxima Ultragreen. I've caught all my Steelhead on the Grandmax and all my trout on the UGreen. Will try GMax this spring on trout,etc.

Peter ><>

"Follow Me and I will make you fishers of Men"
Matthew 4:19
 

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I use the Orvis super strong for both trout and steelhead fishing. It seems to cast very well and the straightness has never been an issue, as long as you lube up your knot before you cinch it down. I like it and will probably never switch unless I see a big reason for it?? Then again I have yet to hook into a steelhead too ;)
~Patrick ><>
 

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Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
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For trout up to ten pounds I use Rio Powerflex, very happy with that. I use it in the 110 meter spools. The only knots that break on me with this are the ones my guests tie. I tie allot of knots. For big fish and big fish in the salt I often use maxima in ultragreen or chameleon. Only because it's so much cheaper.I have used the Fleurocarons and they have utility in nymphing and egging for abrasion resistence. And of course there's less showing under water because of the lower refraction of light in the material. I think they are all hosing us on the price of flurocarbon though.Rio commented that the perfection loop and the clinch knot and improved clinch knot both fail on flurocarbon. But i never had that problem and use those knots extensively.
 

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I have never had a problem with knots in flourocarbon either, but have stopped buying it because of environmental concerns...I use Rio and Umpqua tippets almost exclusively and like them much better than the orvis or any other brand that I have fished.
 
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A recent fly-fishing magazine featured an article on flouro and how long it takes to break down in nature. Basically it takes long enough to tangle a few birds' feet and kill them. As for price, it reminds me of a guy who owned a chainsaw shop and had a huge,old, heavy, dangerous saw by the door priced at $700. When I asked him why the saw was so overpriced he replied: "Hey, if someone's stupid enough to lug that piece of crap around all day, they're stupid enough to pay $700 for it too." Flouro is thick, stiff and bad for the land. I'm sure the suits love it though. I'll stick with Rio. :hmmm
 

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For chasing around the big fish I have been using Maxima Ultra Green.

When it comes to trout and light tippits, I use Umpqua now exclusively. Its a little more money, but not much, It has worked flawlessly for me and I almost always use 5x and 6x. It works well for me, so Umpqua will continue to get my business. Just my $0.02

J
 

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I didn't know that fluorocarbon is difficult to knot. Do you suppose it's because I use the tie-fast tool or a no slip loop? No attitude here, just something that occurred to me. And it occurs to me that I gave up tying fluoro and mono together with a surgeon's knot or a blood knot.
 

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I gave up fluor for the reasons mentioned above.

Steelhead: Maxima Ultra Green
Trout: Powerflex or Dai-Riki

You gotta tie up some of Rickard's Seal Buggers. I use Paul Jorgensen's Seal-EX for the body, a blend of black and red in a ratio of 2:1. With purple schlappen hackle, silver ribbing and a marabou tail...it looks very sexy in the water and works wonders as a lake fly. I suspect it would be equally successful for steelhead and trout in rivers.

-Crock
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks everyone for chiming in. The knot issue that I have experienced goes something like this: I'm fishing an eastern WA lake in early October and the bite just doesn't stop. Most of the fish are ~12-14" but several go bigger and a few just make a mockery of my 5wt and 5x tippet. My lead fly is tied on 4x mono, trailer fly on 5x flouro. After just about every fish, I run the line through my fingers looking for abrasion and give a good tug to check knot strengh. Several times the knot popped on the 5x, but never on the 4x. I use improved clinch knot. . .but have been using the Uni-knot this winter and haven't broken it yet . . .anyway, My problem was that any good sized fish that took my trailer fly would break me off at the knot if I had been fishing the tippet material for more than an hour or so.

I think it comes down to the leader getting brittle after a short time of casting and pulling in a few fish. Maybe it was the brand (Berkely Vanish) but it happened enough that I felt silly for not carrying some mono tippet as backup for the failing flouro.

Now I'm going shopping for some Umpqua and Rio tippet . . .see you out in the desert.

Rod
 

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Since Orvis Super Strong came out in 1988, I've been using it from 7X to .013". I still have and use some of the original spools, and they seem as strong as ever. (I never leave tippet spools exposed to daylight.) I've been trying some of the newest, strongest fleuros, such as Seaguar Grand Max 1X for steelhead; can't tell whether it helps or not.
Some perspective: I believe that the improvement in tippet materials is the greatest advance that fly tackle has made during my lifetime. I remember my early days on Silver Creek, when I regularly broke off average trout on 5X Gladding Gladyl, even with a soft fibreglass Phillipson rod. I wouldn't mind fishing over challenging trout with my original rods, reels, and lines, as long as I can have my 21st Century monofilaments!:thumb
 
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