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Not yet but I've thought about it, Norm. Recently I went to using a drafting chair recently which is working surprisingly well - I prefer to look down slightly on a fly when I'm tying & this chair has sufficient height adjustment to allow me to alter my position periodically and avoid a stiff neck when I'm at it for an extended period.
 

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No, but like Jim, I've often wondered about picking up an old drafting table somewhere and converting it for fly tying duty, since (with the right chair) I could use it for sitting or standing, as well as providing plenty of desk real estate and convenient areas for lighting.
 

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In one of his books A.K. Best offered that the best tying position was one which allowed the upper arms to hang vertically from the shoulders. I fully agree and found that the best way to accomplish this was to tie standing up (at home I tie at a rather tall bench). At various tying events I've found that tying at a standard height table while sitting in a standard height chair causes me to develop a pain between the shoulder blades. Last year at Albany I talked to someone who was using two boat cushions stacked on his chair; something I plan to try. Just a heads-up; the next upcoming tying event is the Fly Tiers' Rendezvous in Portland on November 13th, an enjoyable, low-key event.
 

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At various tying events I've found that tying at a standard height table while sitting in a standard height chair causes me to develop a pain between the shoulder blades.
This is the very reason I know longer do exhibition fly tying at the Tying Expo in Albany. My back can't handle it.
 

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I would like to see some pictures of a tying station for standing, if someone has some. I have been considering this for a while. I'm in an office chair or car most of the day and it's getting my back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)

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Been thinking on this and it occurred to me a soimple solution. Back in another day, I did high end catering. The chefs tables were simple standard folding tables, but they placed a 1-inch PVC conduit on the legs to raise them up. About 12 to 14 inches long, they slid over the table legs as risers. Not too pretty but effective.
 

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I wanted to refresh this post...anyone switched to standing tables? Some companies are now requiring a certain amount of standing and have programmed desks that raise and lower.

Just curious. I saw Joe52 was standing and he seemed to like it...any others?
 

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I have a standing desk at home, because I work in tech and I'm glued to my computer. I've also had them at every office I've worked in, for many years.

Standing desks are good for work, but standing in one position is worse for your body than sitting down. If you buy a standing desk, you also need a foam mat, balancing board, stepper or something like that. A standing desk fanatic might reply here saying that this isn't true, but I have a challenge for that person; see how long you can actually stand at your desk, without putting your foot on your chair or doing weird leg movements, before replying. :p

I don't like tying flies standing up, because it is less stable; the higher center of gravity obviously makes the table less stable, but your body also sways a lot more. The standing position also sort of prohibits you from using your elbows/forearms to brace yourself.

They are good and I consider them essential for me, but there's definitely a lot of hype and they don't always work out as well as people expect.
 

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I tied on my drafting table for years, really liked it, seemed pretty comfortable and the downward view didn't bother me. Now I tie on my roll top desk, which looks cool but isn't as comfortable.
The drafting table is used for drafting again, and my computer monitor, which is on a riser so seems really comfortable when spending long hours there.
 
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This item allows a person to sit or stand at their work surface as preference changes through the day. It seems as though it could be applicable to tying. I'm sure a number of vendors sell it. Illustrations for clarity only so spare me the WalMart angst.
Output device Font Screenshot Computer monitor Electronic device


Font Document Parallel Number Symmetry
 

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This item allows a person to sit or stand at their work surface as preference changes through the day.
I worked at two companies that tried these, to avoid replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. Let's just say... after wasting a lot of money on those, both companies ended up replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. :p

At work, we have the fancy ones with motors. I just use a cheap manual one, from IKEA, at home. See below. They are not very expensive and I'm sure there's even cheaper ones around.

 

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I worked at two companies that tried these, to avoid replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. Let's just say... after wasting a lot of money on those, both companies ended up replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. :p

At work, we have the fancy ones with motors. I just use a cheap manual one, from IKEA, at home. See below. They are not very expensive and I'm sure there's even cheaper ones around.

That looks beefy enough to let me tie bass flies with kevlar thread!
 

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I worked at two companies that tried these, to avoid replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. Let's just say... after wasting a lot of money on those, both companies ended up replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. :p

At work, we have the fancy ones with motors. I just use a cheap manual one, from IKEA, at home. See below. They are not very expensive and I'm sure there's even cheaper ones around.

@longputt Though it was an old thread but I see where your going.
They swept through our building about 3 years ago. I think 2 people work at standing desks now. (Before we were sent home. )I don't care for the standing podium work stations and use them as little as possible, even in the classroom (they are one size fit all and after 4-6 hr's of running gis and cad class on the computer it hurts).
IT at work and my PT people (been in PT off/on for 20yrs) helped set me up a seated position at work in my office so my arm doesn't tingle or go dead and my lower back doesn't lock up. I can set up a tying station similar, but I still have to get up and move. After years of working on my feet cooking, surveying and teaching I'd recommend good, sturdy, supportive footwear when standing at a desk for any length of time if you go that way.
 
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