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There are several multiple tip line systems out there, Rio, Cortland, Cabela's. Has anyone tried them, and what are your experiences, impressions of this type of system?
Do they cast well? Hinging? Hang up in the guides? I notice they start with a 5 WT; does this imply that lighter lines are more of a problem? I'm considering a 5WT on new LA reel.
Thanks!
Oh, by the way, Nunnally is fishing really well right now. Some upwelling of cooler water and had a ball with dry damsels Wednesday. Nothing like 20" fish on a dry! Boy they really slam it. Chiro's (black #16) and damsel nymphs also.

Ronbow:thumb
 

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All I can comment on is with the Rio. I like it a lot. I haven't seen any of the rest but have heard of them. The Rio versi-tip is based on their windcutter tapers, with a heavier belly and a smaller than usual front taper. The finish is pretty smooth and slick with the running line and all but the intermediate tip (it is clear so not lubricants were used). That isn't an issue since the intermediate tip should be outside you guides when you are casting. The sink tips are density compensated. The loops are stiff with no apparent hinging that I have noticed but I have yet to use it during the warmer weather. You will have to dip your rod when fighting a fish and the loops are going through the guides. If you want to keep the tension on, you can also turn your rod so that the guides are facing up when the loops are going through.

Hope this helps.
 

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Formerly Tight Loops
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Now, first off, hanging in the guides is not a real problem, unless you are shooting line with less than 15' out of the guides, and I doubt anyone wants to. The tips are likely out of the guides on all casts.

I have an AirFlo Multitip, and it is great! I have had it for about a year and a half, and it shows little signs of aging, after thouslands of casts.

If you hunt around, a couple of manufacturers make a 4 wt multitip setup.
 

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I have fished the Rios for a couple of years now in the 7 and 10 weight versions. The only time I notice the splice is when it's going through the guides and even then its OK, it just bangs around a little.

I just bought a Scientific Anglers saltwater quad-tip. It looks and casts fine on the front lawn but I don't know how it will hold up in the heat yet.

I'd rather have separate spools and lines but the virsitip is more cost effective and less bulky in the vest.

I don't know why manufactures start with 5 weight lines - don't even want to speculate on that one except to say I seldom use my 4 and under rods with anything but a floating line
:)
 

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I fish the RIO system as well. I was skeptical of the whole concept at first, but its great coming up to a run, reading the water, and being able to match it with line/sinktip before you even start. Conditions change as you move along the water ways. Its Great. The loops do not hinge, they are stiff. You do get a little banging around going through the guides, but the line does not cast worth a crap unless the tip is completly out. I have yet to fish my clear intermediate but I'll tell ya - that type 8 tip that you get with them is the BOMB! I LOVE IT! I have yet to LAND a steelhead on my system so I dont know about the loops and fighting fish, but so far I am very pleased with the system and glad I bought it. I should have done it sooner. Good Luck!
 

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I've been using a Scientific Anglers WF8 multi-tip system on small salmon rivers like the Vedder. It's held up fine to a number of stubborn chum and coho.
The multi-tip idea was clearly derived from the usual practice of spey fishers, to cut off the tip of a floating line (usually a double-taper or long-belly WF), add a braided loop and an assortment of floating and sinking tips, usually around 15 feet. This was such an obviously cost-effective method that it's no wonder that the line makers eventually adopted it.
Although we prefer to match loops and tips (usually one or two sizes lighter than the belly) for even energy transfer, I wonder if that's a problem. I've cast many times with tips that have limp, undersized connecting loops (this is with spey rods), and if the forward cast has enough power, they all turn over and extend properly.
 

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I've used both Rio and AirFlo - Rio by far the better line. But most shop guys will be happy to replace your broken mainline AirFlo loop a with mono loop rather than send the line back to England, so no worries. And keep the faith, the water level will eventually go down enough to retrieve your lost tips (just mark the area). After fishing both lines side by side with literally hundred fish from salmon to steelhead, rio/airflo side by side, no contest: Rio. AirFlo seems to have memory like an elephant, and weak loop strength. I don't spey so have no idea about casting one vs. the other on the double hand grips.
 

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Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
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My experience is mixed on this. I like the Airflow systems since they did such a great job of working out the earlier welded loop systems a few years ago. Rio's earlier connections were not as nice and tended to hang up in the guides a little- enough to be annoying.

But the more recent editions of the Rio system are very good and they have come up with one of the better, smoother connections out there. Of course there are a few others, though some of them are made by the same factory,(3M/Scientific Anglers), and they may be just as good.

I have grown most supportive of Rio since they pour so much into development of all their products and often replace or upgrade things as they progress. I would say they are a little "closer to the water" than some of the rest, especially for the Pacific Northwest.

One note on loops being a problem in the guides: I see this a lot when people are short lining, like nymphing, but especially glo-bugging in shallow water, and there is a cure. In close work you can remove the long tapered floating tip section and just work with the long running section. At least on the Rio lines it has enough taper to handle the needs of close casting. End of problem.
 

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I have 3 Airflo Multi-Tip lines, in 5, 7, and 9 weight.

The good things about the Airflo line (which was the line Cabela's sold as their own last year, but I don't know about this year):

1)The ()welded) loops are the best, IMHO, on the market. Go through the guides like butter.

2)The main line is slick, has a hard coating, shoots well, and floats high.

The bad thing about the Airflo lines:

1) No matter what the ads say, these lines have a TON of memory. I typically straighten my lines before starting a day of fishing, and this line doesn't ever quite get "straight", and I typically have to straighten it many times during the day. I'm thinking it almost might make a good warm saltwater fly line . . .

If I had to choose a brand of fly line to use, SA would probably be my brand line of choice. However, IMHO, I think SA and Cortland didn't do as well as they could have with their multi-tip designs.

If I had to now choose between the Rio and the Airflo, I'd probably pick the Rio. Although I really like those welded Airflo loops, I think the main line of the Rio is better for fishing, which to me is overall more important than the difference in the loops.

Just my $0.02 . . . :professor
 
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