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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

My name is Darren and I just caught the fly fishing bug...uh, no pun intended of course. I've been curious for many years and finally picked up a rod the other day. It was a pathetic display of ignorance but I loved every second. Went and bought a half decent setup to start my adventure at a local fly fishing shop. They helped me with my casting a bit to where I wasn't snapping the fly off and was able to hit the general area I was aiming for. I'd have to say I'm much improved after the quick lesson. I've never actually caught a fish yet because I've only tried once and of course lost the fly fairly quickly :BLUSH.

My question has to do with actually bringing the fish in. I'm used to trolling with my trout rod and just reeling the darn thing in. When I'm stripping line in and get a hit with 10' of line at my feet what comes next? Do I strip the fish in or do I take the slack up in the reel and continue from there? I told you I was a virgin :AA.

Any other pointers are welcome. Advice, links, books, teasing...whatever. Oh, I'm having a blast in my back yard practicing, I'm improving quite a bit. I can cast about 50' with ok technique. I'm a little confused about the exact timing for the cast after I've pulled the line back. I'm not sure I've eliminated the snap in the line. I can't seem to sense the tug of the line behind me. I know I'm supposed to wait unil the fly has extended but how do I know?

Thanks a ton!

Darren
 

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Most trout you catch around here you can just hand line in. If it's an aggressive fish, or if you're into playing it, you can use your fingers to put tension on the line and let it take the slack line out until you're at the reel. Again, if you're into playing fish, you could let it peel line off your reel and use your reel to ultimately bring it it. But I rarely use my reel to bring trout in. I want to get the fish in as soon as possible, partly because if you're C&R'ing it puts a lot less stress on the fish, and partly because I'm paranoid about losing the fish the longer I leave it in the water. Plus if you hand line a fish in it's that much easier to have your line on the water and fishing again after you release a fish. (I'm lazy.)

Reels are pretty critical for landing big fish, whether trout, steelhead or salmon. I don't know if my technique is sound, but if I get a big fish on with slack line at my feet, I put tension on the line with my fingers and let the fish take the line out until it's taut to the reel. Big fish will inevitably peel line off the reel (hopefully into your backing every once in a while). The drag from the reel (hopefully you have a good disc drag reel for this kind of fishing but I guess some people palm the reel to create drag) will help tire the fish enough to allow you to reel him in.
 

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Find your nearest fly fishing store and spend some time there. They can steer you to videos that you may find useful. They may also take a look at your casting form in their parking lot and give you a pointer or two if not a lesson. Remember, they want you to come back and do business with them again and again so the good stores will often go the extra mile for you and provide excellent customer service. Good luck and see you out on the water.

Tight lines - Tom.
 

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Don't be afraid to watch your line while you are casting. It's ok. If you are casting 50 feet, you are doing better than most beginners and a lot of veterans. Like I said watch your back cast to see when the line is straight then start your forward stroke slowly increasing the speed of the stroke to the stop position. After awhile it becomes second nature. You just know when the line is straight behind you. Good luck and have fun.

There are as many ways to land fish as there are fly fishermen. Try hand striping the fish. Try slowly letting the fish take the slack line until you have him on the reel. You are going to loose a few until you figure out the way you prefer to do it. I might strip a fish in if he is not too big but prefer to put larger fish on the reel and let the reel's drag do the work. It is a matter of personal preference and you will figure yours out in time. Again, good luck and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the good information so far. I've been doing some reading on the site and other resources. I have a few things I can do to improve my casting etc. and it's nice to have the information on reeling vs. hand stripping the fish in. I'll just experiment to see what I'm more comfortable with.

Just as a side note. The guy who sold me the rod was showing me the general performance of the rod...basically what he could achieve with it. I watched him cast through the line and into the backing...about 80 some feet with a little wind coming at him. he shot a ton of line on that cast...truly amazing to watch. It is such an art. My claim of 50 feet is with no wind, in my back yard, and quite sloppy. I'm good at the distance but my accuracy and consistency at that range is poor. I do catch on quickly to things such as this so I hope to improve rapidly but am not expecting it. I'm having a lot of fun just as things are so improvement from here is gravy.

Thanks again.

Darren
 

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Fly casting is about timing and line management. If you are frequently standing in a pile of spaghetti ....keep practicing

PS As in golf , accuracy is more important than distance... :pROFESSOR
 

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Go to a park and practice with yarn as your fly til the sun goes down! After you cast your fly and have it land on your target, keep your right index finger holding onto the line slightly enough to where you can pull in excess slack with your left hand. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Fly casting is about timing and line management. If you are frequently standing in a pile of spaghetti ....keep practicing

PS As in golf , accuracy is more important than distance... :pROFESSOR
Ah, yes. I agree 100%. I've been practicing trying to hit brown spots in my lawn as of late. Doing ok with this. I'm fairly accurate at 20-30 feet. Quite fun, even better than lawn darts :THUMBSUP

I bought a couple of books on special on correcting casting errors etc. It's mostly illustrated and addresses common problems. I'm going to do a little reading and possibly take a beginners course at the shop where I bought my rod.

Darren
 
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