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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In a state where the Steelhead, Salmon and Coastal Cutthroat are the "big names" of the salmonid world (some Bull Trout love, too), it seems that the true resident wild Rainbow Trout is sort of lost in the mix some?

Besides the Yakima River Rainbow, what else is an iconic wild non-anadromous rainbow?

Redbands of the Upper Columbia/Spokane?

Elwha River trout?
Coastal resident rainbow seem to be hit and miss.
Do people really come across that many?

Just seems that the wild resident rainbow is somewhat forgotten statewide?
 

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Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
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In a state where the Steelhead, Salmon and Coastal Cutthroat are the "big names" of the salmonid world (some Bull Trout love, too), it seems that the true resident wild Rainbow Trout is sort of lost in the mix some?

Besides the Yakima River Rainbow, what else is an iconic wild non-anadromous rainbow?

Redbands of the Upper Columbia/Spokane?

Elwha River trout?
Coastal resident rainbow seem to be hit and miss.
Do people really come across that many?

Just seems that the wild resident rainbow is somewhat forgotten statewide?
Out here on the Olympic Peninsula, anadromous rule the roost. There are always some "residualized steelhead" in our rivers. but the populations are nothing like the true resident rainbows in the rivers east of the mountains.
 

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Flaccid Member
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Resident rainbow populations are expanding, at least in Puget sound. I'm no expert but I'm guessing the combination of CNR and selective gear regs for trout, and the downturn in anadromous productivity has allowed the resident life strategy to thrive. They are amazing fish and IMO, in need of some new research. I have a lot of questions about where they go throughout the year and what their story is.

Here is a pretty one that ate a bull trout streamer and went ballistic.

Water Vertebrate Fish Plant Watercourse
 

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Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
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Interesting topic.
I've caught a number of fish over the years that definitely have the resident form look to them. Others look like they might be jack steelhead.
I caught a fish on a OP stream in September many years ago on a dry fly that had a almost golden tint to it more similar to a brown trout then a dark steelhead. This stream doesn't have summerruns in it from what I know.
My buddy and I spoke with some biologists that were doing snorkel surveys on a stream that also has summer and winter steelhead. We mentioned catching 16-20" fish that looked more like rainbows then steelhead. I suggested that they might be steelhead that had residualized to the stream. They said they'd never seen that on this stream and looked puzzled by what we were describing.

I agree with Sean. The resident form seems to be expanding. I caught a number of fish from a certain PS stream while fishing chums that were just plugged with chum eggs.
SF
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Redbands are anadromous - when they can be, just like all rainbows in river systems that connect to the ocean eventually. Therefore, I am not sure I understand the question.
Just looking for, I guess, "resident" fish that complete their lifecycle without going to saltwater. Either by choice or natural barriers. Spokane River Rainbow Trout - above the falls that cannot get out, or even coastal fish that complete the cycle without going out to salt.
Aren't the Yakima Rainbows pretty much fully resident freshwater fish? Yakima rainbows are not redbands (?), but Methow rainbow and steelhead are redbands?

I believe there are quite a few headwater fish populations that choose to stay fresh exclusive.

Hope that sort of helps define my question-sorry if foggy on how to word it better-perhaps one of the resident biologist can jump in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Resident rainbow populations are expanding, at least in Puget sound. I'm no expert but I'm guessing the combination of CNR and selective gear regs for trout, and the downturn in anadromous productivity has allowed the resident life strategy to thrive. They are amazing fish and IMO, in need of some new research. I have a lot of questions about where they go throughout the year and what their story is.

Here is a pretty one that ate a bull trout streamer and went ballistic.

View attachment 119647
This, to my eyes, looks resident as you say too. Wow !
It is indeed an interesting thought that as salmon and steelhead runs dry up, resident fish can do better with less competition from the missing fingerling/smolts.
 

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Still fly fishing in the PCW
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Just looking for, I guess, "resident" fish that complete their lifecycle without going to saltwater. Either by choice or natural barriers. Spokane River Rainbow Trout - above the falls that cannot get out, or even coastal fish that complete the cycle without going out to salt.
Aren't the Yakima Rainbows pretty much fully resident freshwater fish? Yakima rainbows are not redbands (?), but Methow rainbow and steelhead are redbands?

I believe there are quite a few headwater fish populations that choose to stay fresh exclusive.
"Aren't the Yakima Rainbows pretty much fully resident freshwater fish? No, not fully. There are some who choose to go to sea as well as strays. Steelhead get over Roza every year, not many, but some. Yakima rainbows are not redbands (?) Native Yakima River rainbows are redbands, as are all native Columbia Basin rainbows. However, due to former heavy planting with non-native rainbows, there are fewer redbands in the lower reaches than in the headwaters and tribs. but Methow rainbow and steelhead are redbands?" A steelhead is a rainbow, so both life histories of Methow rainbows may either be a redband or a non-native rainbow. Based solely on my personal experience, I would say the Methow has more redbands than the Yak but from what I have read, the non-native rainbows still outnumber the redbands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
"Aren't the Yakima Rainbows pretty much fully resident freshwater fish? No, not fully. There are some who choose to go to sea as well as strays. Steelhead get over Roza every year, not many, but some. Yakima rainbows are not redbands (?) Native Yakima River rainbows are redbands, as are all native Columbia Basin rainbows. However, due to former heavy planting with non-native rainbows, there are fewer redbands in the lower reaches than in the headwaters and tribs. but Methow rainbow and steelhead are redbands?" A steelhead is a rainbow, so both life histories of Methow rainbows may either be a redband or a non-native rainbow. Based solely on my personal experience, I would say the Methow has more redbands than the Yak but from what I have read, the non-native rainbows still outnumber the redbands.
Excellent information. Thank you! As a west sider, was not clear on the divisions of redbands
 

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Mad Flyentist
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Lake Washington tribs, one in particular, offer excellent resident rainbow fishing.
During the short summer season (when it's open) it is not uncommon for me to land a dozen or so in the 18-20 inch range, with countless smaller fish In between. This of course means lots of time on the water, but it is close to home for me. Not a lot of west side rivers can come close to that.
 
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