Washington Fly Fishing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone I have wanted to take a wild edibles class in the greater Seattle area. I have looked up a few . Just waondering if any of you guys/ girls have taken any classes or have any suggestions. Thanks Jason
 

·
Justified
Joined
·
4,940 Posts
I've never taken classes, just "word of mouth". Honestly, there is so much online now, you couldn't go wrong going that route.

There's an old book out there called, 'We Like it Wild' that is an interesting read. I can't remember who wrote it though.
 

·
Ignored Member
Joined
·
12,110 Posts
Hello everyone I have wanted to take a wild edibles class in the greater Seattle area. I have looked up a few . Just waondering if any of you guys/ girls have taken any classes or have any suggestions. Thanks Jason
Try some of the community colleges in your area. Up here both Whatcom Community College and Skagit Valley College have offered classes on this topic which also included field trips to help learn what, where, and when to gather first hand. I believe they focus mainly on mushroom and fungi.
 

·
Outta Here
Joined
·
3,912 Posts
Yup...went that route decades ago. It all tastes like shit...seriously. Nobody did it better than Euell Gibbons, but even he used a hellaceous amount of seasonings to make the dreck palatable.

Were the days of 'natural living and diet' superior? Doubtful....

At this point in your life you're habituated to processed food heaven, but I suppose there's the reward of virtuous 'natural' ingestion (whatever that is). It's a nice and harmless novelty diversion, anyway. You'll get over it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
Hi Jason, I've never taken a class but what I do know about them is they tend to focus on what is seasonal at the time (not a broad overview). I used to be in the wild foods business and I have a pretty good knowledge of what can be found in the northwest and how to find and prepare it. I would be happy to give you some info on where to get started and would even be down to get out for a trip come spring. Send me a PM and we can discuss.

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
When I read "wild edibles" I think about venison, elk, salmon, and chantrelle mushrooms.
I th0ught "wild edibles" would reference Cannabis crop growing in small spaces between canopy trees of the forest. Or, a hallucinogenic mushroom that grows wild, prolifically, and locally in certain city parks.

I had a huge number of these "wild edibles" sprout in the cedar bark of my outdoor dog area. Must have been a solid 3' x 3' square area, root system seemed connected, much like a piece of carpet.

Food Mushroom Ingredient Wood Staple food

Hand Wood Fence Grass Plant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,734 Posts
Yup...went that route decades ago. It all tastes like shit...seriously. Nobody did it better than Euell Gibbons, but even he used a hellaceous amount of seasonings to make the dreck palatable.

Were the days of 'natural living and diet' superior? Doubtful....

At this point in your life you've tasted heaven though, I suppose there's the reward of virtuous 'natural' ingestion, whatever that is. It's a nice and harmless novelty diversion, anyway. You'll get over it.
I am like this. Sure, I will pick little wild blackberries and freeze them for Thanksgiving and Christmas family dinners, but I am stopping for a Big Mac and salty fries on the way home ! : )

Seeds are for birds, Ketchup is king!
 

·
Indi Ira
Joined
·
9,505 Posts
Hi Jason, I've never taken a class but what I do know about them is they tend to focus on what is seasonal at the time (not a broad overview). I used to be in the wild foods business and I have a pretty good knowledge of what can be found in the northwest and how to find and prepare it. I would be happy to give you some info on where to get started and would even be down to get out for a trip come spring. Send me a PM and we can discuss.

Dave
Sign me the heck up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Hi Jason, I've never taken a class but what I do know about them is they tend to focus on what is seasonal at the time (not a broad overview). I used to be in the wild foods business and I have a pretty good knowledge of what can be found in the northwest and how to find and prepare it. I would be happy to give you some info on where to get started and would even be down to get out for a trip come spring. Send me a PM and we can discuss.

Dave
That's interesting Dave. You should teach us all by starting a new thread!

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
 

·
Newb seeking wisdom
Joined
·
726 Posts
Hi Jason, I've never taken a class but what I do know about them is they tend to focus on what is seasonal at the time (not a broad overview). I used to be in the wild foods business and I have a pretty good knowledge of what can be found in the northwest and how to find and prepare it. I would be happy to give you some info on where to get started and would even be down to get out for a trip come spring. Send me a PM and we can discuss.

Dave
I'd be down for some education and assistance.
Let me know if we can form a little group.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,387 Posts
One of the shop folks at Boeing did some field sampling and was in the hospital for 8 weeks praying his kidneys would survive. He was certain about what he had identified as edible. To each their own, but that was enough for me to stay clear of eating stuff from the woods.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hbmcc

·
Indi Ira
Joined
·
9,505 Posts
One of the shop folks at Boeing did some field sampling and was in the hospital for 8 weeks praying his kidneys would survive. He was certain about what he had identified as edible. To each their own, but that was enough for me to stay clear of eating stuff from the woods.
Do you also stay away from all stores and restaurants?

http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,847 Posts
What I've tried from my neck of the woods: morels and shaggy manes sliced and sauted in butter, wild asparagus and onions(good if harvested at just the right time), wild rice(more prolific around here than I ever would have guessed, and pretty decent. And I am not a big rice eater), cattail bulbs(similar to a potato, but taste a little muddy. I would only resort to them in a survival situation), camas bulbs(it's actually pretty decent). Bitterroot isn't so decent, but it's meant to be dried and ground into flour.
Wild but invasive blackberries are everywhere. Native wild strawberries, huckleberries, and thimbleberries are everywhere in the mountains.
Most conchs that grow on trees in the PNW are edible, though to very different degrees. I've never tried it, but the "chicken of the woods" is a very desired conch. Sliced, seasoned, and sauted it is supposed to taste just like chicken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Hey Jason, check out Langdon Cook's "Fat of the Land". He's is the local and semi famous (look on KUOW/NPR) forager of wild edibles.
http://fat-of-the-land.blogspot.com/2016/02/spring-classes-lectures-announced.html
http://kuow.org/search/google/langd...57945544:sdo8ngmuwts&cof=FORID:11&sitesearch=

One of my flyflicker buddies is friends with him and said he's a genuinely nice guy, passionate, super knowledgeable and loves to share. He started out with just blogging gaining a small following and now has grow it into quite a business. His classes seemed to be always booked months in advanced. I've never taken his classes but want to.

Like many folks here, the enjoyment of flyfishing is complimented by an ever expanding sphere of discovery, enjoyment and appreciate of all things natural. It's also learning little tidbits from fishing buddies including what little gems can be harvested from the beautiful wild lands that are sanctuary for the fish we pursue. Seems the crustier the fisher is, the more he/she knows where and what fruits can be (safely) harvested here in the great northwest.

Happy and safe foraging,

Ellis
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top