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I've been working my way through the writings of Steve Raymond for few months now. Ya know, it's funny how you read a good book and wonder how you didn't read it sooner, kind of like you found a little piece of heaven in the writings of angler lore. This book amazes me, Steve Raymond can write in such a way, that I feel like I can see what he see's in my minds eye. His descriptions of places and times is epic as he recants his travels through places I've been lucky enough to see for myself, and others I wish I could of seen before they were lessened over the years through man's impact on this planet that we inhabit. Still, I hang on the pages as his angling tales unfold in front of me. I think some of the topics on this forum that are, well, heated as the old guard tries to teach the young bucks how things are done, or not done, could be explained to the new guys better by telling them to pick up a good book and read about the history of places and things. I wish that would have been done for me, but I stumbled along and found places and things out for myself, which in itself has it's appeal. It's fun to think about the seasons as they pass by, and remember a place and time when you had all your ducks in a row, and the fishing was fast and furious. Like magic in a way. You feel a sense of accomplishment and yearn for more of that feeling when all was right, no wrong could be done, and realize it was all a dream. YT :smokin
 

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I used to know it all---but now that I'm older I seem to forget it all.

I'm not saying anything about his books but I've tried to read two of his books twice and I just can't seem to get interested in them. I like to read books about fishing.I've read Bob Arnolds book "Steelhead Water" twice. He seems to tell you about his places that he fishes. Thats how I found a few of the places that are new to me this year. What I like in a book is that the first page reaches out and grabs you and you can't put it down. His books don't do that to me.But I could be weird.

Jim
 

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read one mans steelhead shangrlai stories of the originals cat cut leader super 8 vid gas rationing and no road up the south side of the skagit made me go looking where the place could have been and if it could ever come back
john
 

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The Shangrila Hole is gone forever. Logging and development has changed the path of the Skagit forever.

Not to worry though. There are still a few real nice Shangria Holes on the Skagit. You just need to foot it a few miles and you will find them.
 

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Damn and I was so hoping the Richard Marcinko was a flyfisherman....LOL I'm a big fan of Marcinko's and I know what your talking about the book just grabbing you and not letting go. On the other hand though I have a book of Hemingway's on fishing and I can't put it down either. so maybe that makes me wierd also, I dunno...

Scott
 

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ya I know its gone but still went there because the clues in the book told me where it would have been the native run of steelhead on that particular creek are also gone most of that day was spent thoinking of a time when there was no road on that side, I knew the man who worked the ferry at lyman back then when shangralai was alive and just exploring for a nother fresh water creek that would feed another backwater where early fish would wait for high fall waters. since now as far as I know a true summer run skagit fish is a novelty to be sure the only ones Ive found are from that hatcherie at j creeek to actually find a pool which held once again native skagit summer run fish would add years to my life and a secret I would take to the grave.
 
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